Astro's Blog

Visit to Millersville University Part 2

By: Astrometeor, 11:41 PM GMT on March 31, 2013

So, with our tour being over, (see previous entry), we were left stranded by our guide with directions on how to get back to the admissions building. We walked for a while, went and had lunch over at a restaurant that our tour guide recommended and then we set out for the weather center. Mom thought it was on one side of campus, but me and dad knew it was on the other. Mom insisted, so we followed her, but sure enough, me and dad were right after we ended up asking for directions from the admissions center (embarrassing!).

We walked over there, let ourselves in, went up via the elevator to the meteorology floor, walked around for a while reading the posters, then we finally asked one of the professors if he had time to spare. He answered that he was currently administering a test, and didn't know whether he could answer our questions, but he said he would give it a shot. And then proceeded to answer our questions with stunning understanding and ability to communicate his feelings through to us on the variety of topics that we asked.

The first question was about Millersville's reputation. The professor said that was the reason why he came to the University in the first place, he originally taught at the Navy's school. Millersville's reputation he said came around that the school routinely produces the best students of meteorology, partly because of the education, and partly because of the hands-on research opportunities that are available to undergraduates that are not as easily to obtain at the larger state schools such as PSU and OU. He said that students here get to partake in 2 or 3 research opportunities in their Millersville careers if they are willing to work for it.

Another thing that he said was that there are only 4 professors in the department, so the whole college is a tight-knit family that helps itself out. The colleagues don't edge each other for research money, they all work together for the students and for the progress of science. That is what he thinks sets Millersville off from the other universities.

Next, he talked a little more about the research and his colleagues. He said that contrary to what the university likes to show, on how it is a top-tier teacher school, the real money comes from the meteorology program as the professors obtain grants from NOAA, NASA, DOE, and other organizations. He mentioned one grant that one of the fellow professors is going to use this fall and take some students to Arizona for atmospheric research. That sounds pretty good to me.

Turns out he had a lot more time than I think he expected, a couple of students would interrupt us every now and then as they asked questions about the test, but a lot less than he thought. So, he showed us the weather center.

There were something like 12 monitors displaying the latest radar and satellite pictures along with model data being displayed. From the professor, "Yeah, they replaced all the paper maps that I enjoyed more with all of this a couple years ago." Paper? Blech. He said that although there is a button-pad for security on the door, they give the password to the students so if there is ever something going on, they can go there to watch it. He said that sometimes the students are in there way past 3 a.m. and they take full advantage of the monitors and the dozen or so computers with weather programs and software operating on them.

My little brother poked fun at that^, saying I am always up at odd hours trying to claim there is "interesting" weather going on. Well, that's cause there is. Some people. And he thinks weather is boring, well most people do, but those people have no taste, lol.

The professor also high-lighted upon the fact that although the NWS doesn't offer too many jobs, there are plenty available elsewhere. Those who disagree haven't looked hard enough. He said the DOE is a big taker of white meteorologists (after 9/11 they have been weeding out the foreigners), and Accuweather loves to take one or two of their graduates every year as they expand (Accu is one of the largest private forecasting businesses on the world, if not the largest). He said that the reputation that Millersville has built means that Penn State reserves at least two spots every year for Millersville graduates for their graduate program since they know the students are so well-taught. He said that all of the graduates of Millersville have no trouble figuring out what they want to do after graduating with their B.S. in meteorology.

He talked for a bit about the coursework. One of the biggest killers he said was the calculus involved. Some students don't realize their is math involved until they get to college, and to them, it is like running into a brick wall. However, Millersville has set up study sessions with seniors, so that the underclassmen don't feel lost. He further said that has reduced the drop-out rate to below 50%. That is impressive since from what I have heard, that is what kills students, the calculus. Good thing I like math.

About that time the students came out talking about the test. Sounded just like a normal group of students discussing a test, "Did you know the answer to this?" That was somewhat reassuring, knowing that some things don't change, no matter what your level of educational learning is. I didn't ask them anything, was sort of too scared to.

Finally, the weather professor said that while he was interested in severe weather, unlike another student who happened to be walking by, which she turned and gave a look back at him, he said that he doesn't stay up at odd hours like the students will. Sometimes for the big events he comes in to see some things and he will find 10-15 students already there and stacked up on snacks and watching the storms.

One of the other professors came by, and he elaborated a little more on the above, seemed like a nice guy too.

That weather center place impressed me the most, that such a small university could have that atmosphere coupled with the professors' willingness to let their undergraduates partake in research was mighty impressive to me. Never had thought that someone would give OU a run for their money, but now Millersville is my #1 on my list.

Locations of Site Visitors

Visit to Millersville University Part 1

By: Astrometeor, 9:53 PM GMT on March 31, 2013

So on Tuesday March 26, I journeyed from my grandmother's house in Camp Hill, PA to Millersville, PA.

Camp Hill to Millersville-Google Maps

There lies Millersville University, a school founded on teaching people how to become teachers but now known internationally for its meteorology program. I first learned of this university actually through Wunderground, when the blog was bored one day (happens a lot) and everyone was discussing which schools were top-notch and helpful to those looking to become meteorologists. Some lamented the fact that they couldn't find any jobs available and were switching majors but one blogger mentioned Millersville and thus piqued my interest.

As this was to be my second and third college visits (PSU was to be third and U of Oklahoma was first) I was understandably excited for this opportunity to see these schools. However, I did not think that neither were going to be that impressionable on me. The University of Oklahoma does tornado chasing during the summer, has the SPC right there, has a great football program, nice temperatures, and has tornado-proof dorms (dorms break up tornado's circulation). What could possible be better than that?

So, a part of me was excited in seeing other universities as I prep for senior year, but another part of me was a bit doubtful, I didn't see any way that another school could potentially be better than OU.

The trip down to Millersville wasn't bad, 43 miles, a relatively short trip. For the first part the skyline opened up and offered us a glimpse of one of the cooling towers of Three Mile Island, and boy was it producing condensation clouds. Nice sight to see, considering its past. I happen to be in possession of a copy of the official Congressional report on the accident that happened there. I have read it multiple times, and yet, I still support nuclear energy as an alternative fuel source.

Walk into Millersville's admissions building, routine stuff, take packet and check your name off on a list they have to make sure they have the correct info about you. Well, mom has always asked me to make sure what my birthday was. This one time, she got it wrong. BY ONE DAY. Sheesh. So, I go sit down, read through the information presented, blah blah blah, things that all universities say to a prospective student, not really swaying and not interesting. We had this group tour and power-point session scheduled with the assistant director of admissions there. So, there was 30 or so other people there in the room too.

Presentation time. Sigh. It was a run of the mill slide-show. "Historic buildings" "Safety is important to us" "We work for your child's education" Blah blah blah. I didn't fall asleep, but I really see no point in why schools do this, do something that actually stands out, not just having thousands of universities saying the same thing over and over again. I don't care about the buildings or the school's past, I want to know if my FUTURE would be spent well at this campus.

One thing that stood out to me, no idea why, I guess it is because I am a teenage boy, but the make-up of the school is 56% girls. "A better dating atmosphere for the boys"-from that presenter. (atmosphere, lol, weather joke.) Although, hopefully, if anyone knows me, that percentage will mean nothing to me.

Our tour guide was excellent, an out-going senior who knew all there was to know about the workings of the university. Unfortunately, he said that the president was retiring as well, and so I would not have the opportunity to see her at work. He said that she would often invite students for dinner and would frequently walk around campus and strike up conversations with students about various topics. He mentioned the meal plan, something that I was glad to hear (I love food, eat more than what most Americans eat, yet maintain a healthy weight). My favorite plan was a 19 meal per week plan that allowed me to eat at all-you-can-eat buffets they have on campus. Drooling still at the thoughts of that. Wouldn't have to worry about going hungry which is what universities used to do, from what I have heard from adults at least.

We got to look at a dorm-room, the beds were bunked to give more space, other-wise it was a standard dorm room, maybe a little bigger than most. They said that they were tearing down the dorms and building new ones suite-style all centered around a grassy commons area. You could see the construction in the distance as they worked.

We saw the two swans at their pond, one is named Miller and the other is S'ville. Strategically named, huh? Big birds, knew that a swan was big, but that was the first time I had ever seen any.

Nothing else sticks out about my tour, it was pretty standard for a university tour, but the guide did the best one can do.

Next post is about the weather center that I visited that is located on the Millersville University campus.

Locations of Site Visitors

Colleges

Thoughts on Traveling on Palm Sunday

By: Astrometeor, 10:43 PM GMT on March 22, 2013

Things to look forward to on PA trip:

Snow-there is some in the forecast for Sunday night into Monday night, no word yet on accumulations.

Relatives-I get to visit my mother's side of the family, they don't travel much due to my grandmother having knee issues.

Colleges
-I am visiting Penn State and Millersville University next week to check them out and see which one will be higher on my list of colleges when I apply.

Traveling-I like road trips, you get to see scenery and some exciting things, this one promises to be 13 hours long, better pack-up on some items to keep me busy.

Relaxation-I can have some time to let go of some off my responsibilities, like walking my dog/brushing him, and I will be able to play some games.

Myself-this trip is all about my future and where I am going to go to college, so people are going to be asking me how I feel on things quite a bit, better prep myself to be able to answer them.

Things that I am not looking forward to:

Sleeping Accommodations
-I won't be sleeping in my own bed, which I have found to be my favorite place to sleep, no matter how nice the hotel or family house I am visiting.

Home-sick-I will miss my home and Tennessee that I both love dearly.

My pets-none of them are able to come, and my dog I shall miss the most, he is my best friend, and he is getting on in his years.

Schedule-I won't be on my regular off-pace schedule where I eat at odd hours and snack, others will have me doing a regimental style day.

Sleep-I will be on a tight schedule in relation to how much sleep I can get. No going to bed at midnight and waking up at one in the afternoon.

Locations of Site Visitors

Travels

Tornado Communication Strategies

By: Astrometeor, 12:54 AM GMT on March 22, 2013

So, my mother and I have talked on and off about this for a while now. And that is, can the NWS get warnings out to people better?

Nowadays, tornado warnings have lead times on average of 30 minutes. Yet, with all the large tornado disasters such as Joplin, there is always someone who said that they had no idea this was coming. I, of course, when upon hearing that, goes and bangs head on the wall, because I had heard of it on national TV 15 minutes BEFORE it struck the city (Joplin). So, really, while I have mercy for victims of these violent mini-cyclones, I lose a great deal of pity for those who let these words come forth from their mouths.

There are many solutions that have been proposed. NOAA weather radios, HAM radios, text alerts, TV on when severe comes, news cycles handing out the warnings, and so on.

What I would like to see implemented would be a system in which when a tornado warning is activated, a continuous message to be splashed upon the screen (with sound for the blind) that shows the message and blocks whatever else the user could be watching. If on a TV, make the TV switch channels to an emergency weather channel of some sort or the local news channel who would no doubt be covering the emergency. I would have it so, the system was default and could not be turned off by the user.

I would like parents to also teach the importance of these warnings to their children, every time we have a drill, hundreds of students poke fun at the people who are holding those children's lives in their hands. Life and death is not a laughing matter, and too many a child does not realize this until horrific consequences strike.

Discuss

Locations of Site Visitors

Warmer vs Colder than Average Temps

By: Astrometeor, 12:09 AM GMT on March 22, 2013

Spring is usually the harbinger of warmer temperatures, and that is what I hope yesterday is to be.

Unfortunately, right now the temperature is colder than "normal". Of course normal is described as the average, and the only way to get the average is to take the cold temps, the hot temps, and average them out.

Today, the high was 42 for my area, that is 20 degrees below normal for this time of the year. Nornal high is about 63. It would be somewhat nice to have a day 20 degrees above average for this time of year, an early 80 degrees wouldn't hurt me all that much. It might hurt the plants, as it would lull them to a false sense of summer. But I would enjoy it immensely.

Now, 80 degrees might trigger some unsettling weather, such as those hail storms that raked the deep South a couple of days ago. But, since my interest in weather is in severe storms, that wouldn't bother me one bit, disregarding any property damages to myself or others around me, of course.

Now last year, I remember that March was one of the worst um Marches in record, stringing up a nice number of tornadoes. As Dr. Masters pointed out, so far this month, we have had 6, a rather measly number, of tornadoes. Add the two up and divide by two, and we get roughly average. Ta-da! Also lst year was the fact that we had freeze warnings all the way up till about the second week of May, on and off. Then we finally got to warming up and later would go on and see 107 in the summer (that was fun).

Hopefully, this year we won't take as long in warming up as we did last year, but also we won't get as hot as last year. I love 90+ days (my dog loves the indoors), but 100+ for four days was rather ridiculous.

All in all, mother nature, please bring your warm side out, I am lookin' forward to enjoying it. ;-)

Locations of Site Visitors

Spring Snow?

By: Astrometeor, 11:45 PM GMT on March 21, 2013

Hello again Wunderground community.

Tomorrow morning there is a chance for snow in my area. Discussion from the Nashville NWS in their Hazardous (indeed) Weather Outlook for my area:

HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
544 AM CDT THU MAR 21 2013

TNZ005>011-022>034-056>066-075-077>080-093>095-22 1045-
STEWART-MONTGOMERY-ROBERTSON-SUMNER-MACON-CLAY-PI CKETT-BENTON-
HOUSTON-HUMPHREYS-DICKSON-CHEATHAM-DAVIDSON-WILSO N-TROUSDALE-
SMITH-JACKSON-PUTNAM-OVERTON-FENTRESS-PERRY-HICKM AN-LEWIS-
WILLIAMSON-MAURY-MARSHALL-RUTHERFORD-CANNON-DE KALB-WHITE-
CUMBERLAND-BEDFORD-COFFEE-WARREN-GRUNDY-VAN BUREN-WAYNE-LAWRENCE-
GILES-
544 AM CDT THU MAR 21 2013

THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR MIDDLE TENNESSEE.

.DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT

A BAND OF DEEP ATMOSPHERIC MOISTURE IS EXPECTED TO SWEEP
NORTHEASTWARD ACROSS THE MID STATE...CREATING SOME LIGHT SNOW OVER
SOUTHWESTERN AREAS LATE TONIGHT...AND OVER OTHER AREAS FRIDAY
MORNING. SOME MINOR ACCUMULATIONS MAY OCCUR...ESPECIALLY ON GRASSY
AREAS...AND A FEW SLICK SPOTS COULD DEVELOP ON SOME HIGHWAYS...
MAINLY BEFORE SUNRISE FRIDAY...AND PRIMARILY ON BRIDGES AND
OVERPASSES.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...FRIDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY...

NO HAZARDOUS WEATHER IS EXPECTED AT THIS TIME.

.SPOTTER CALL TO ACTION STATEMENT...

SPOTTERS AND LOCAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS ARE ENCOURAGED
TO REPORT ANY SNOW ACCUMULATIONS TO THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
IN NASHVILLE.
I am highly doubtful as to whether or not snow will stick or not. It has been too warm in recent times to suggest that this will happen. But perhaps on the benches we will see this happen.

My next 24 hours forecast from my NWS:





Tonight: A 20 percent chance of snow after 1am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 29. North wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the evening.
Friday: A chance of rain and snow before 9am, then a chance of rain. Cloudy, with a high near 48. Southeast wind around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 50%. Little or no snow accumulation expected.


A fellow blogger of mine has also been checking this system, anyone who has yet to do so should go and read it:

MaxWeather

Locations of Site Visitors

On the topic of religion and its relation to Science

By: Astrometeor, 6:29 PM GMT on March 21, 2013

So, today on the blog there was a minor discussion in to whether or not God is fake. This comment from one of the more outspoken bloggers, Neapolitan, started it:


Of course, we create fictions to help us forget about that ephemeral existence. We tell ourselves that we have dominion over all; we invent gods to explain our existence, and then we invent comforting afterlives that give us the comforting power of immortality. We tell ourselves that we've been here forever, so we'll be here forever.

To which allahgore responded with, "Prove that GOD is fake."

SPLbeater came back with a rather inadequate reply: " Wasting your time...all he will do is use more faulty evolution crap. Cant prove nothin :D "

From there I gave a little insight into how I perceive this whole notion of religion: "First, I am a Christian.

My take on all of this is quite simple, religion was invented by humans to describe the world around them and explain why certain events happen. Basically an early science, albeit one that does not stand up to today's standards.

Now that we have a better understanding of what goes on, and have thus disproven the idea of gods multiple times through the laws of physics, some people just can't let go of religion, it is a good story and has lessons to be learned from it, it just isn't real. "


From there the discussion continued with Neapolitan and another pointing out that the topic of disproving such a theory is moot and impossible because:

But first came allahgore's reply to what I said:"Prove that GOD is fake. Just you saying it, is not proof."

^On that, I would like to say that I did not say that GOD was fake, I said that the laws of physics that we know to be true and that govern this world have proven that such a being can not possibly be true or we would have proof by now plus the fact that it is impossible scientifically speaking goes ahead and throws any chance of God existing out the window.

Religion is a story, meant to explain the natural wonders of the world. The story that we have today is not the same story that was passed down for hundreds of years by the Jews until a monk wrote it all down an collected it together in the 3rd or 4th centuries AD. No doubt there may be some huge changes in it. To prove this is easy and simple, just gather a bunch of people in a room and say something into one person's ear and tell them to pass it along. By the time the last person hears it, the two lines will be nowhere near the same in substance.

Here is Nea's response to allahgore: "I can't do that, not anymore than you can prove that Zeus or Suijin or Thor or Santa Claus or the Easter Bunny are fake. That's Logic 101: no one can prove a negative. "

Another blogger's response to this: "Logical fallacy. The burden of proof relies on the one making the claim. A logical way of thinking helps in understanding natural phenomena such as weather. "

Then allahgore comes back with a response to Nea and the above blogger's statements.
"If you can't prove it then why even say it? as much as you beat on people asking them to prove things, YOU of ALL people should be willing and able to back-up what you say. end of rant. "

"scroll down and see who made the first claim. hint: was not me."

And finally, my final response to this short discussion:"What Wilson said, a logical fallacy in effect. You can't prove that God exists for that matter. I could go all hyperbolic and say that I believe in unicorns and leprechauns, but that doesn't make them real."

I would rather know that what I believe in is real, rather than putting false hopes into things that do not exist."


I really do not see why some people are so stubborn. The story is a great story for one to believe in, it has great lessons, the main gist of the story just isn't true. I don't want everyone to go atheist, that is not my point, I just am pointing out the ill-based logic behind all religions and their foundational roots. I definitely do not want people going and joining hate groups, such as the atheist group up in Wisconsin whom clearly doesn't understand the Constitution.

One more thing before I publish this blog, the following two statements are directed either at me or are coming from me:

The first, from RTSplayer: "Can you elaborate on your justification of how you can simultaneously be a Christian while not believing in the existence of God, since the basic tenet of the Christian faith is that Jesus was Christ and the Son of God?

How can you believe in the Son of God if you do not believe a God exists?

I find that you are either a liar, or you don't know what you're saying... "


And followed with my response: "Paradoxical is it not? I do know what I am saying, I think.

I believe in what the Bible teaches us and the lessons for humans inside of it. Also I look forward to heaven since currently I have yet to find a strong enough reason or explanation to what happens after death. Therefore, I would like to suppose that I am a Christian in how a real Christian should be modeled, using what the Bible teaches us and applying it to my daily life as best I can. Believing in god and Jesus Christ, in my opinion, is not how/what a Christian should act/do.

That is what I believe.

P.S. I have no idea how to express my beliefs, the above was my best shot at it."


Feel free to discuss this in the comment section, I will gladly reply to all questions and concerns.

Locations of Site Visitors

Science (general)

SPRING! or is it?

By: Astrometeor, 10:39 PM GMT on March 20, 2013

So, as others have pointed out, today is the first day of spring and is the vernal equinox. So 12 hours of day and 12 hours of night at the equator.

However, seems like for at least the east coast of the United States, winter still has her icy grip on us. Snow and cold temps are forecasted for at least the next week out, and no end in sight.

But an almanac has a good website full of information and fun facts on spring, everyone should go check it out. The comments are pretty funny too. Thanks to my local NWS for providing me with the link!

Springtime is here at last

The following two pictures are pics taken on the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in the springtime. It is the most visited national park, and having been there, I can say it is the most beautiful of them all.



Thanks to this blog for the above picture.



Thanks to Jerry D. Greer for this above picture.

Locations of Site Visitors

Spring

Nice dose of rain to end winter

By: Astrometeor, 9:02 PM GMT on March 20, 2013

Georgia right now is in the process of filing a lawsuit in the U.S. Supreme Court against Tennessee for Nickajack Lake on the TN/GA border.

Keep dreaming Georgia

They must be really jealous of us after we got more healthy rains to keep us out of the drought and prepare us for spring and summer. From the same storm that gave us a pair of tornadoes and some pea-sized hail.



Locations of Site Visitors

Rain

Tornadic Morning for Tennessee

By: Astrometeor, 12:57 AM GMT on March 20, 2013

Woke up yesterday morning to tornado sirens and my mother asking me why. The funny thing was, they were not steady sirens up where I lived, so I responded, "maybe they are testing". Father later said that they were constant downtown, so who knows. But when I checked the NWS and WU, sure enough, there was a red box over my head. Whatever, shall deal with it. The storm weakened before it got to my area, but it did give me pea-sized hail and some REALLY bright thunderbolts.

Others on the other hand received tornadoes. The report from the NWS:


TORNADO OVER NORTHEASTERN HUMPHREYS
COUNTY...EXTREME SOUTHEASTERN HOUSTON
COUNTY...AND WESTERN DICKSON COUNTY
(SEE MAP AT THE END FOR A GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION
OF TORNADO TRACK)



PNSOHX
TNZ005>011-022>034-056>066-075-077>080-093>095-19 1300-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
850 PM CDT MON MAR 18 2013

...NWS DAMAGE SURVEY FOR 03/18/13 EF1 TORNADO EVENT - UPDATE #2...
UPDATED INFORMATION ON THE EF1 TORNADO THAT AFFECTED HUMPHREYS...
HOUSTON...AND DICKSON COUNTIES IN THE MORNING HOURS OF
MARCH 18 2013.


RATING: EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 105 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/: 10.6 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/: 150 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

START DATE: 3/18/2013
START TIME: 740 AM CDT
START LOCATION: APPROX 5 MILES NORTH OF MCEWEN
START LAT/LON: 36.1859/-87.6281

END DATE: 3/18/2013
END TIME: 751 AM CDT
END LOCATION: 0.25 MILES SOUTHWEST OF VANLEER
END_LAT/LON: 36.2316/-87.4463

A HIGH-END EF1 TORNADO WITH MAX WINDS AROUND 105 MPH TOUCHED DOWN IN NORTHEASTERN HUMPHREYS COUNTY AND CROSSED FAR SOUTHEASTERN HOUSTON COUNTY BEFORE ENDING JUST SOUTHWEST OF VANLEER IN WESTERN
DICKSON COUNTY. OUTBUILDINGS WERE DAMAGED ON WHITE OAK ROAD WITH SHEET METAL WRAPPED AROUND TREES. ONE BARN WAS DESTROYED AND SEVERAL OTHERS SUFFERED ROOF DAMAGE ON HWY 46 NORTH OF CEDAR ROAD. FURTHER TO THE EAST...ONE HOME COMPLETELY LOST ITS ROOF ON
HILL ROAD CAUSING THE COLLAPSE OF THE NORTH EXTERIOR WALL. HOWEVER...THE ROOF APPEARED TO BE POORLY ATTACHED TO THE HOME. DEBRIS FROM THE HOME WAS BLOWN OVER 100 YARDS TO THE NORTHEAST. A
POORLY CONSTRUCTED SINGLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ON HALIBURTON ROAD WAS BLOWN 50 YARDS TO THE NORTH INTO TREES AND COMPLETELY DESTROYED.
ONE BARN WAS DESTROYED AND OTHERS DAMAGED FURTHER EAST ON HALIBURTON ROAD. DOZENS OF TREES WERE SNAPPED OR UPROOTED ALL ALONG THE TRACK. TOTAL PATH LENGTH 10.6 MILES WITH A PATH WIDTH 150 YARDS.

SPECIAL THANKS GO TO THE DICKSON COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY WHO ASSISTED WITH THIS STORM SURVEY.

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES TORNADOES INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.
EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE: THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW THE EVENT AND PUBLICATION IN NWS STORM DATA.



DESTROYED MOBILE HOME ON HALLIBURTON ROAD, DICKSON COUNTY. [PHOTO CREDIT: SHAMBURGER, NWS]



img src="ROOF LIFTED FROM HOUSE ON HILL ROAD, DICKSON COUNTY. [PHOTO CREDIT: SHAMBURGER, NWS]">



TRACK OF EF-1 TORNADO IN HUMPHREYS, HOUSTON AND DICKSON COUNTIES. 03/18/2013

TORNADO NEAR CHRISTIANA...IN RUTHERFORD COUNTY
(SEE MAP AT THE END FOR A GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF
TORNADO TRACK)


NOUS44 KOHX 190254
PNSOHX
TNZ005>011-022>034-056>066-075-077>080-093>095-19 1500-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
954 PM CDT MON MAR 18 2013

...NWS DAMAGE SURVEY FOR 3/18/13 EF0 CHRISTIANA TORNADO IN
RUTHERFORD COUNTY - UPDATE #2...

UPDATED INFORMATION ON START AND END TIMES...LAT LONS...PATH
LENGTH...AND DAMAGE.

RATING: EF-0
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 85 MPH
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/: 3.8 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/ : 100 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

START DATE: 03/18/2013
START TIME: 1211 PM CDT
START LOCATION: 2.7 MILES EAST OF CHRISTIANA
START LAT/LON: 35.7059/-86.3512

END DATE: 03/18/2013
END TIME: 1218 PM CDT
END LOCATION: 6.3 MILES ENE OF CHRISTIANA
END LAT/LON: 35.7264/-86.2891

A BRIEF WEAK EF0 TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN IN EXTREME SOUTHEASTERN
RUTHERFORD COUNTY EAST OF CHRISTIANA SHORTLY AFTER NOON ON MONDAY
MARCH 18 2013. THE TORNADO BEGAN ON SLEDGE ROAD WEST OF PLAINVIEW
ROAD...CROSSED INTERSTATE 24 SOUTH OF EXIT 89 AT EPPS MILL ROAD...AND
ENDED ALONG JACOBS ROAD EAST OF EXIT 89. MINOR DAMAGE OCCURRED TO
SHEDS AND OUTBUILDINGS AND ABOUT 100 TREES WERE BLOWN DOWN.

SPECIAL THANKS GOES TO THE RUTHERFORD COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
AGENCY WHO ASSISTED WITH THIS STORM SURVEY.

EF SCALE: THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE CLASSIFIES TORNADOES INTO THE
FOLLOWING CATEGORIES.
EF0...WEAK......65 TO 85 MPH
EF1...WEAK......86 TO 110 MPH
EF2...STRONG....111 TO 135 MPH
EF3...STRONG....136 TO 165 MPH
EF4...VIOLENT...166 TO 200 MPH
EF5...VIOLENT...>200 MPH

NOTE:
THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO
CHANGE PENDING FINAL REVIEW OF THE EVENT AND PUBLICATION IN NWS
STORM DATA.



TRACK OF EF-0 TORNADO IN SOUTHEASTERN RUTHERFORD COUNTY. 03/18/2013

Below is a photo of a shelf cloud, taken as strong-to-severe thunderstorms moved across the
Nashville area on the morning of March 18, 2013. The photo was taken along the Shelby Street
pedestrian bridge, looking northwest:



A shelf cloud overhangs LP Field in Nashville. 845 am CDT, 03/18/2013. [PHOTO CREDIT: Chayot Thongklin, Chief Meteorologist for Rural TV]
Shelf clouds form as warm, moist air rises along the front edge of a
gust front and are associated with strong to severe thunderstorms.



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March Snow Pictures for Middle Tennessee

By: Astrometeor, 3:31 AM GMT on March 08, 2013

Snowfall pictures from various photographers from the March 2 snowstorm for Middle Tennessee. Check them out! Thank you to the Hendersonville NWS office for providing me with the link to these beautiful pictures.



Buck Mountain, just east of Cookeville (Putnam County) 03/02/2013
[PHOTO CREDIT: ROSS BINKLEY]



Measuring 2.5 inches of snow at Buck Mtn, just east of Cookeville (Putnam County)
appr. 3pm, 03/02/2013 [PHOTO CREDIT: ROSS BINKLEY]



The snow kept falling at Buck Mtn on the night of the 2nd and the morning
of the 3rd. The final measurement (on 03/03/2013) was 5.5 inches! [PHOTO CREDIT: ROSS BINKLEY]



SNOW ALONG A QUIET ROAD IN COTTONTOWN (SUMNER COUNTY)03/02/2013 [PHOTO CREDIT: MATT ROSENBOOM]



AN INCH OF SNOW FALLS IN MACON COUNTY ON MARCH 2ND.
2 MI EAST SOUTHEAST OF WESTMORELAND (MACON COUNTY) -- 03/02/2013, 540AM[PHOTO CREDIT: CHARLES LORING]



3.7 MILES WEST NORTHWEST OF LEBANON ( WILSON COUNTY)-- 03/02/2013[PHOTO CREDIT: ROBERT FISHER, COCORAHS OBSERVER]



WILSON COUNTY MEASURES AROUND A HALF INCH OF SNOW ON MARCH 2ND. 3.7 MILES WEST NORTHWEST OF LEBANON, (WILSON COUNTY)-- 03/02/2013 [PHOTO CREDIT: ROBERT FISHER, COCORAHS OBSERVER]



SNOW DUSTS THE BOTTOM OF THE RAIN GAUGE. 3.7 MILES WEST NORTHWEST OF LEBANON (WILSON COUNTY)-- 03/02/2013 [PHOTO CREDIT: ROBERT FISHER, COCORAHS OBSERVER]



SNOW COVERS THE MAGNOLIA IN WHITE HOUSE ON MARCH 2ND. White House (Sumner County)-- 03/02/13
[PHOTO CREDIT: Massie]

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My team won Science Olympiad Regionals! Woot!

By: Astrometeor, 9:50 PM GMT on March 07, 2013

So, my high school team won first place this past weekend at a community college Regional Tournament competing in events that are STEM-based and known collectively as Science Olympiad. We plus our middle school team (they won second) will advance in our respective divisions ( C=high school, B=middle) to our state tournament at the University of Knoxville on April 6 for a chance to win first there and advance to nationals. Only one time has my school been to nationals and that was with a legendary group of students who got first, second, or third in most of the 23 events and led Tennessee to its best showing at the national stage ever.

The competition itself is very active (trying to find right word to describe), if you do not do well under pressure, then this stuff will surely get your heart rate up. I was an alternate this go-around which means that if anyone did not show up, I would take their place in their respective events. Luckily, that did not happen for the high-school team. However, I did run something like 4 miles in 4 hours running errands for people who had forgotten things or errands for my mother/coach who needed more information on some things (like what is the internet password for the college). At the awards ceremony, we placed in 13 of the 23 events, which was pretty good. When they announced team winners, they said high school: Friendship Christian, MLK, and St. Bernard. So we had our picture taken and we sat down. Then they said, "sorry, that was middle school." So the middle schoolers go nuts and run up there and get their trophy and picture taken. They also took our trophy away from us. We were in absolute shock. Then they announced the high-school winners. In second place was Ravenwood, and my team's hearts fell even farther down. We had been hoping for second, there were two other schools there that routinely go to state. And then drumroll......in First Place is......MLK!!! We went nuts over this jubilant news, ran up there, grabbed what was rightfully ours, got our second picture of the day and started a short chant, "MLK, MLK, MLK, MLK!!!" We went from elation to dejection to elation in a span of about 3 minutes. Talk about adrenaline rush.

Every year there are 23 events, some test-based and some build-based, all being specific in their own fields of science. I have won third at state in Meteorology, Dynamic Planet back in 8th grade and I have won fifth place at state in Robot Arm and Dynamic Planet last year.

If you are in high-school currently and your school does not have Science Olympiad, I advocate strongly into organizing this club for next year. It is a very fun but challenging experience and I can guarantee that all the hard work that is put into these competitions pays off for everyone in terms of fun, and excitement. For more information on the 23 events that are offered this year (they change every year) go visit Science Olympiad's official website and consider joining this great competition!

Also, teams and individuals who do great in these events receive money and scholarships from local universities and it also looks great on one's college transcript as SciOly (an abbreviation) is one of the more premier organizations out there in the United States.

For more information on how Science Olympiad works and other info, check out their home page:

Science Olympiad

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January Tornado Outbreak

By: Astrometeor, 9:13 PM GMT on March 07, 2013

So, as I had already mentioned numerous times, I have been sick lately and so I am going back and finishing up a couple blogs that I worked on a while ago.







Overview
A powerful upper level trough moved across the United States from January 29, 2013 into January 30, 2013. This system contained unusually strong winds aloft, with wind speeds of 80 mph just 2,500 feet above the surface and up to 150 mph at 20,000 feet! A record warm airmass with temperatures in the 60s and 70s spread northward ahead of the system into the Tennessee and Ohio Valleys, bringing weak atmospheric instability into the region. As a powerful cold front moved eastward across the Mid State during the early morning hours of January 30, a line of showers and thunderstorms known as a Quasi-Linear Convective System (QLCS) developed and raced through the area, producing numerous tornadoes and widespread wind damage. This severe weather event resulted in 1 fatality and at least 3 injuries across the Mid State.
As of February 7, 2013, 21 tornado tracks have been confirmed by NWS Nashville personnel and Emergency Management Agencies. Another EF1 tornado was confirmed in Lincoln County by NWS Huntsville staff. This total of 22 tornadoes makes the January 30, 2013 event the largest January tornado outbreak in Middle Tennessee history, eclipsing the previous record of 12 tornadoes that occurred on January 24, 1997. It also makes January 30, 2013 the second biggest outbreak of tornadoes for any month in Middle Tennessee history. The largest tornado outbreak on record occurred on April 3, 1974 when 24 tornadoes struck the Mid State. Also of note - several of these tornadoes were the first January tornadoes ever recorded in many of the affected counties.

I had a couple of close calls with this particular outbreak, was under two tornado warnings I believe. Didn't realize how bad it actually was until the NWS got done with their storm report a week and a half later. Then I was like, "Wow, didn't think we had that many tornadoes, lol." One of the things that impresses me is that this outbreak has become the second largest outbreak for my area, second only to the Super Outbreak of '74.

Link to news article from NWS

^The above link has a chart with data on each and every tornado, click on one and you will be taken to a different weather page filled with all the tornadoes data and their track maps. Or just use this link if you want:

Optional URL

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TWC and choice of programming

By: Astrometeor, 8:52 PM GMT on March 07, 2013

Some of the portions of this was typed when Nemo was/just happened. The rest I have just typed up today as I add more comments to it.

//begin rant

So, the majority of the items on weather.com are still talking about Nemo, and the next blizzard. Not really paying attention to the severe weather outbreak in Mississippi and Alabama. Lost more respect for TWC. I mean, it is okay to talk about a giant storm if there is nothing else weather-related going on, but when there is a tornado outbreak going on in the South, I would expect the only major weather TV channel to be featuring that and the subsequent tornado warnings rather than something that is old news and everyone is not paying attention to anymore.

On the TV, there are more commercials playing than the minutes they have spent on the tornadoes. That is just sad and pathetic really. When there are tornado emergencies going on, I bet the NWS would appreciate it if every possible media site is covering it. I know that they eventually did coverage on this system, but the fact that they were tardy to the party (one of my favorite phrases) is almost immoral and unethical.

And then the shows. Reef Wranglers? Discovery had a thing on this a couple of years ago, they got rid of it because it is such a boring job. Guy picks up piece of concrete, goes sets it down in ocean, checks up on it every once in a while, and moves coral around as needed. At least have shows that are much more pertaining to the weather then "yeah, we pay attention to the forecast." Might as well come video my place and make a show about a high-school student following weather events. <---That is a great idea Astrometeor, we shall do that! Or you could spend the free time that TWC gets and do shows educating the masses about different types of weather, go in-depth into how weather works. Some say that is boring, but those are people with no tastes and shouldn't be watching anyways. If you want it interesting, then talk about interesting things.

Now I am not saying that everything that TWC does is bad (after all it gives financial support to WU) (although that naming thing is PRETTY bad), but ignoring important weather outbreaks is kind of sad. Jim Cantore is pretty boss, love to see him stop by the next time I have severe weather.

//end rant

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The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.