The Battle to Draw Down Lake Okeechobee

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:39 PM GMT on August 24, 2013

After the wettest July ever recorded in Florida, the Army Corps of Engineers is battling to draw down the level of Lake Okeechobee before the September peak of the rainy season. The huge lake represents an important source of fresh water to South Florida, but also poses a grave danger. The 25 - 30'-tall, 143-mile long Herbert Hoover Dike surrounding the lake was built in the 1930s out of gravel, rock, limestone, sand, and shell using old engineering methods. The dike is tall enough that it cannot be overtopped by a storm surge from anything but an extreme hurricane, but the dike is vulnerable to leaking and failure when heavy rains bring high water levels to the lake. The Army Corps of Engineers is scrambling to complete a $300 million upgrade to the dike to reduce the chances of such a failure. However, those repairs are not scheduled to be completed until 2018, and the Corps is warning that the Lake Okeechobee dike is in danger of failure this year should heavy rains from a tropical storm or hurricane raise the lake level and put high stresses on the old dike. A 2011 risk assessment estimated the dike's probable failure rate at every fourteen years. A 2008 Army Corp of Engineers study said this about the vulnerable dike:

"There is limited potential for a dike failure with lake levels as low as 18.5 feet. The likelihood of a failure increases at higher lake levels. At a lake level of 21 feet--a 1-in-100 year flood event--a dike failure would be likely at one or more locations. In the event of a dike failure, waters from Lake Okeechobee would pass through the breach--uncontrollably--and flood adjacent land. Flooding would be severe and warning time would be limited. And with 40,000 people living in the communities protected by the Herbert Hoover Dike, the potential for human suffering and loss of life is significant. Our engineering studies indicate the southern and eastern portions of the dike system are more likely to fail than the northern and western portions of the dike. In general, we would expect a warning time of 24 to 48 hours prior to a dike failure that releases water from the lake; however, under some conditions the warning time might be longer, and under others, a dike failure could occur with no warning."

The city most at risk from a dike failure may be Belle Glade (population 18,000) on the southeast shore. Belle Glade is at 16' elevation. If Lake Okeechobee is at 20' above mean sea level when the dike fails, this implies that at least three feet of water could flood Belle Glade. If a wide section of the dike breaks and there is a Cat 3+ hurricane driving a massive storm surge at the time, then the flood could be much higher. During the 1928 hurricane, which had 130 mph winds while over the lake, the water from the storm surge reached seven feet above ground level in Belle Glade.


Figure 1. Water level of Florida's Lake Okeechobee between January 2012 and August 23, 2013. The SFWMD reported that 2013 had the wettest start to the annual wet season in 45 years, with the district-wide average rainfall for July at 10.36". Heavy rains from Tropical Storm Isaac in late August of 2012 caused a 3.5' rise in lake water levels in six weeks; record rains in July 2013 caused a 3' rise in water levels to 16' in mid-August, just below the record high lake level for that time of year. The Army Corps tries to keep the lake level below 15.5'; the dike surrounding the lake is in danger of failure when the lake level hits 18.5'. As of August 23, 2013, the lake level was 15.6', after hitting a peak of 16.1' early in August. Lake Okeechobee reached an elevation of 18.6' and 18.5'--both 1-in-30-year events--in 1995 and 1998. Image credit: Army Corps of Engineers.


Figure 2. Aftermath of the 1928 Okeechobee Hurricane, showing damage to a cluster of Everglades scientific work stations in Belle Glade. The hurricane killed 2,500 people, mostly near Belle Glade. Image credit: University of Florida, via the historicpalmbeach.com.

The Great 1928 Lake Okeechobee Hurricane
The shores of Lake Okeechobee are the site of the second deadliest natural disaster in U.S. history--the 1928 Okeechobee Hurricane. This mighty hurricane caused catastrophic damage where it struck the Florida coast as a Category 4 storm near Palm Beach, and weakened only slightly to Category 3 strength with 130 mph winds when it passed over Lake Okeechobee. The powerful winds of the hurricane brought a 12' storm surge to the south end of the lake, which overwhelmed the 6' high levees protecting the farm lands to the south. The resulting flood covered an area of hundreds of square miles with water up to 20' deep, and killed at least 2,500 people--mostly black migrant farm workers. A mass grave at the Port Mayaca Cemetery east of Port Mayaca contains the bodies of 1,600 victims of the hurricane. The Herbert Hoover Dike was built in the 1930s around most of Lake Okeechobee in response to this disaster.


Figure 3. When Lake Okeechobee water levels exceed 15.5' above mean sea level, large amounts of lake water are released out of two canals that carry the storm water runoff to the ocean. The western drainage canal flows into the Caloosahtchee Estuary and into the Gulf of Mexico at Fort Myers. The eastern drainage canal flows into the St. Lucie River Estuary and into the Atlantic Ocean near Stuart. High levels of nutrients due to agricultural runoff in the Lake Okeechobee water have been causing toxic algae blooms in the areas marked in green during July and August of 2013.

Lake Okeechobee runoff contributing to toxic algae blooms
Heavy rains that began in early July raised the level of Lake Okeechobee by two feet, to sixteen feet. Torrential rains of 7+ inches from a tropical storm or hurricane are capable of raising the lake level by over three feet in a few weeks; this occurred in 2008, when Tropical Storm Fay took a leisurely romp across Florida, and again in 2012, when Tropical Storm Isaac lumbered past. Under ideal conditions, the Army Corps can only lower the lake at a rate of about 0.4" per day. The Corps has been dumping water out of the lake since May 9, and began dumping water out as fast as it could beginning on July 25, to keep the lake below 15.5'. Had these releases not occurred, the lake would have been two feet higher than it is now. Most of this excess water was sent out Lake Okeechobee's western drainage canal into the Caloosahtchee Estuary, which empties into the Gulf of Mexico at Fort Myers. The Lake Okeechobee water is full of agricultural runoff and laden with fertilizers, and this polluted water, combined with an even greater amount of polluted water coming from local runoff due to heavy rains, caused a toxic red tide bloom in the coastal waters of Fort Myers that is being blamed for a record 133 manatees deaths this year. A lesser amount of Lake Okeechobee water has been sent eastwards into the St. Lucie River, where it drains into the Atlantic Ocean near Stuart through the Indian River Lagoon. A similar level of discharge goes down the C-51 canal in into the estuary by West Palm Beach, the Lake Worth Lagoon. The polluted Lake Okeechobee water, which was also combined with large amounts of polluted local runoff water from heavy rains, has caused havoc in these coastal waters this summer, affecting oyster beds, sea grasses, mangroves, and wildlife. Numerous toxic algae blooms have created lime-green water unsafe for recreation in the Indian River Lagoon, leading to calls by local residents for immediate political action. Temporary relief is at hand, though. On Wednesday, the Corps announced that due to falling lake levels, an easing up of the summer rains, and a forecast for merely average rains over the next week, water releases from then lake would be cut almost in half. A further reduction in flow began on Saturday morning. Governor Rick Scott of Florida announced this week that the state of Florida was committing $40 million to a project to build a reservoir aimed at diverting storm water releases from Lake Okeechobee. However, a press release by a coalition of environmental groups labeled this solution as a "Band-aid", saying "It only addresses a tiny fraction of the sewage, manure, and fertilizer runoff--called ‘nutrient pollution’--that comes from within the St. Lucie watershed, and it does nothing to reduce the nutrient pollution sliming all the other, rivers, springs, lakes and bays all over Florida.”


Figure 4. A toxic algae bloom in the St. Lucie River in Stuart, FL on August 1, 2013. Image credit: Dick Miller.


Figure 5. This photo taken from Martin County Sheriffs Office Air 1 shows thousands of people spelling out “Save Our River” along the Florida shoreline from Stuart to Jensen Beach on August 11, 2013. The people were protesting water pollution due to storm water runoff from Lake Okeechobee and local sources that has caused toxic algae blooms. Source: Martin County Sheriffs Office, via the Martin County Times.

For further reading
Despite repairs, Lake Okeechobee dike remains a danger: August 16, 2013 Miami Herald article.

Jeff Masters


The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

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2239. Progster
3:46 AM GMT on August 26, 2013
Persistent blob with sorta interesting cirrus; 11N 50W. According to CIMSS its associated with a positive vertical convergence/divergence couplet and decreasing shear. The TA is primed; where does the next bubble form?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2238. WeatherInterest
10:08 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Joe Bastardi ‏
alot of warm water waiting for any storm that runs the east coast this hurricane season

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2237. WeatherInterest
10:07 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Joe Bastardi ‏
Another short lived, low ace storm, but get ready the real deal is lurking in the pattern and US open for impact threats

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2236. seer2012
9:40 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2204. Grothar:



OK. I'll give it a wow.

That was a disappointing wow.
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2235. DFWjc
9:31 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 1993. seer2012:


Any chance of a spinner off the end of this front?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2234. sar2401
9:23 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting Bluestorm5:
For those jumping on people for naming storms prematurely, some media did it too... just saying.

@wralweather 40s
We now have Tropical Depression SIX! Might be our next named storm (Fernand) soon...


Considering the NHC said this:
THERE IS A WELL-DEFINED UPPER TROPOSPHERIC OUTFLOW PATTERN OVER THE NORTHERN SEMICIRCLE OF THE DEPRESSION AND STRENGTHENING TO A TROPICAL STORM IS EXPECTED BEFORE THE CENTER CROSSES THE COAST.

It's probably not unreasonable that some in the media think it will become a tropical storm. I kinda wish the NHC wouldn't say things like this.
EDIT: Never mind, no one will ever see this since the Doc has just posted a new blog. I'm probably already 100 comments behind.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2233. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
9:19 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
JeffMasters has created a new entry.
2232. JrWeathermanFL
9:19 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
@2209:
It better end -_-
This is almost like 2011 all over again...
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2231. hurricanes2018
9:19 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2230. Patrap
9:18 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Product: Air Force High Density (HDOB) Message (URNT15 KNHC)
Transmitted: 25th day of the month at 21:14Z
Date: August 25, 2013
Aircraft: Air Force Aircraft (Last 3 digits of the tail number are 309)
Mission Purpose: Investigate second suspect area (flight in the North Atlantic basin)

Mission Number: 1

Observation Number: 09

21:16:00Z 24.417N 92.583W 392.6 mb
(~ 11.59 inHg) 7,754 meters
(~ 25,440 feet) - 438 meters
(~ 1,437 feet) From 156° at 5 knots
(From the SSE at ~ 5.8 mph) -17.5°C
(~ 0.5°F) -18.4°C
(~ -1.1°F) 6 knots
(~ 6.9 mph) 8 knots
(~ 9.2 mph) 0 mm/hr
(~ 0 in/hr) 6.7 knots (~ 7.7 mph)
133.3%
Time Coordinates Aircraft
Static Air Pressure Aircraft
Geopotential Height Extrapolated
Surface Pressure D-value Flight Level Wind (30 sec. Avg.) Air Temp. Dew Point Peak (10 sec. Avg.)
Flight Level Wind SFMR
Peak (10s Avg.) Sfc. Wind SFMR
Rain Rate Estimated Surface Wind (30 sec. Avg.)
Using Estimated Reduction Factor Peak Wind at Flight Level to
Est. Surface Reduction Factor
HDOB Observations

Independent Calculations from Tropical Atlantic

At 21:06:30Z (first observation), the observation was 323 miles (519 km) to the E (98°) from Brownsville, TX, USA.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2229. sar2401
9:18 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting all4hurricanes:

watch your tongue it it might be bored then board up

LOL, so true. You go from watching college football to "Martha, where did all the lag screws go" in nothing flat. :-)
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2228. MississippiWx
9:16 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
TD6 is almost 100% Tropical Storm Fernand.



Station VERV4
EPA & Mexican Government Cooperative Program
Location: 19.202N 96.113W
Date: Sun, 25 Aug 2013 21:00:00 UTC
Winds: N (350°) at 32.1 kt gusting to 41.0 kt
Atmospheric Pressure: 29.76 in and falling



Station SACV4
EPA & Mexican Government Cooperative Program
Location: 19.174N 96.093W
Date: Sun, 25 Aug 2013 21:00:00 UTC
Winds: NNW (340°) at 34.0 kt gusting to 36.9 kt
Atmospheric Pressure: 29.77 in and falling
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2227. sar2401
9:16 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting JrWeathermanFL:
Fujiwara with NGOM AOI, 06L, and 95E??

I bought that up earlier. There's no chance it will actually happen, but the proximity of the storms makes an interesting picture.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2226. all4hurricanes
9:16 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2214. muddertracker:
Forget dumb and dumber. This season is bored and border.

watch your tongue it it might be bored then board up
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2225. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
9:16 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2214. muddertracker:
Forget dumb and dumber. This season is bored and border.
its to pick up shortly window is opening however slowly
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2224. DocNDswamp
9:16 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
re: 2208. 1900hurricane 4:09 PM CDT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 1900hurricane:
I see we have Tropical Depression #6. Not too shabby!



Great microwave view, 1900, thanks... Captures both AL06 and close proximity of 95E just below.
Been a fairly productive ELY wave!

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2223. stormpetrol
9:16 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2207. Patrap:
Yer 7 obs behind there petrol


just logged on to Google Earth, so far it appears it is not updating regularly on my computer :)
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2222. canehater1
9:15 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2217. Patrap:
Never seen a 3 way Fujiwara, and I'm purty close to the French Quarter too.


lol...G'day Pat...
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2221. VR46L
9:15 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2215. JrWeathermanFL:
Fujiwara with NGOM AOI, 06L, and 95E??


That's an interesting Idea ...
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2220. sar2401
9:15 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting DelawareJack:
Re: TD6 > Weakening will occur afterwards as the circulation interacts with the mountainous terrain of eastern Mexico and the system should entirely dissipate in 36 to 48 hours...or sooner, not harming the 3 people who will be impacted by this rain.


Spent a lot of time around Veracruz, have you? I guess you missed the about 7.7 million people who live within the cone.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2219. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
9:13 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2218. congaline
9:12 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2185. Patrap:
Looks like more to come in the GOM even as the two systems in the W. move on....
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2217. Patrap
9:12 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Never seen a 3 way Fujiwara, and I'm purty close to the French Quarter too.
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2216. HurricaneAndre
9:11 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
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2215. JrWeathermanFL
9:11 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Fujiwara with NGOM AOI, 06L, and 95E??
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2214. muddertracker
9:11 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Forget dumb and dumber. This season is bored and border.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2213. GeorgiaStormz
9:10 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2174. nrtiwlnvragn:


Hey it has been a whole week since we had a storm in the Atlantic Basin.



7 days of no storms makes one weak.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2212. Patrap
9:10 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Product: Air Force High Density (HDOB) Message (URNT15 KNHC)
Transmitted: 25th day of the month at 21:04Z
Date: August 25, 2013
Aircraft: Air Force Aircraft (Last 3 digits of the tail number are 309)
Mission Purpose: Investigate second suspect area (flight in the North Atlantic basin)

Mission Number: 1

Observation Number: 08

21:06:00Z 25.300N 92.367W 392.6 mb
(~ 11.59 inHg) 7,758 meters
(~ 25,453 feet) - 438 meters
(~ 1,437 feet) From 175° at 6 knots
(From the S at ~ 6.9 mph) -17.0°C*
(~ 1.4°F*) -* 7 knots
(~ 8.0 mph) 9 knots
(~ 10.3 mph) 0 mm/hr
(~ 0 in/hr) 7.7 knots (~ 8.9 mph)
128.6%
Time Coordinates Aircraft
Static Air Pressure Aircraft
Geopotential Height Extrapolated
Surface Pressure D-value Flight Level Wind (30 sec. Avg.) Air Temp. Dew Point Peak (10 sec. Avg.)
Flight Level Wind SFMR
Peak (10s Avg.) Sfc. Wind SFMR
Rain Rate Estimated Surface Wind (30 sec. Avg.)
Using Estimated Reduction Factor Peak Wind at Flight Level to
Est. Surface Reduction Factor
HDOB Observations
Independent Calculations from Tropical Atlantic

At 20:56:30Z (first observation), the observation was 294 miles (474 km) to the SSW (206°) from New Orleans, LA, USA.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2211. stormpetrol
9:10 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Looks like the HHs are flying through another TD to find a TS :)
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2210. Bluestorm5
9:09 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
For those jumping on people for naming storms prematurely, some media did it too... just saying.

@wralweather 40s
We now have Tropical Depression SIX! Might be our next named storm (Fernand) soon...
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2209. TropicalAnalystwx13
9:09 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
TD Six makes six tropical cyclones that have been generally weak and short-lived. I think that streak is about to end with the wave exiting the coastline of Africa.
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2208. 1900hurricane
9:09 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
I see we have Tropical Depression #6. Not too shabby!

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2207. Patrap
9:08 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Yer 7 obs behind there petrol
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2206. 7544
9:08 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
next week should be interesting lookin at the models today .
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2205. MiamiHurricanes09
9:08 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Still haven't commenced descending.

210600 2518N 09222W 3926 07758 0438 -170 //// 175006 007 009 000 01
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2204. Grothar
9:08 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2194. HurricaneHunterJoe:


Don't burst their bubbles most wisest of wise :)



OK. I'll give it a wow.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2203. stormpetrol
9:08 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Product: Air Force Tropical RECCO Message (URNT11 KNHC)
Transmitted: 25th day of the month at 20:31Z
Aircraft: Air Force Aircraft (Last 3 digits of the tail number are 309)
Mission Purpose: Investigate second suspect area (flight in the North Atlantic basin)
Mission Number: 1
Observation Number: 01

Mandatory Data...

Observation Time: Sunday, 20:30Z
Radar Capability: Yes
Aircraft Altitude: Below 10,000 meters
Coordinates: 28.2N 91.0W
Location: 135 miles (218 km) to the SSW (205°) from New Orleans, LA, USA.
Turbulence: None
Conditions Along Flight Route: In clouds all the time (continuous instrument meteorological conditions)
Pressure Altitude: 7,320 meters
Flight Level Wind: From 170° at 18 knots (From the S at ~ 20.7 mph)
- The above is a spot wind.
- Winds were obtained using doppler radar or inertial systems.
Flight Level Temperature: -15°C
Flight Level Dew Point: -12°C
Weather (within 30 nautical miles): Thunderstorm(s)
400 mb Surface Altitude: 7,610 geopotential meters

Remarks Section...

Surface Wind Speed (likely by SFMR): 31 knots (~ 35.7mph)
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2202. VR46L
9:07 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2201. Grothar
9:07 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2174. nrtiwlnvragn:


Hey it has been a whole week since we had a storm in the Atlantic Basin.


I can't wait for the models to come out on this one. :)
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2200. Civicane49
9:07 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2199. Patrap
9:06 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
RECON en route to the AOI maybe..


Product: Air Force High Density (HDOB) Message (URNT15 KNHC)
Transmitted: 25th day of the month at 20:54Z
Date: August 25, 2013
Aircraft: Air Force Aircraft (Last 3 digits of the tail number are 309)
Mission Purpose: Investigate second suspect area (flight in the North Atlantic basin)

Mission Number: 1

Observation Number: 07

20:56:00Z 26.200N 92.167W 392.6 mb
(~ 11.59 inHg) 7,755 meters
(~ 25,443 feet) - 438 meters
(~ 1,437 feet) From 323° at 3 knots
(From the NW at ~ 3.4 mph) -17.0°C*
(~ 1.4°F*) -* 4 knots
(~ 4.6 mph) 20 knots
(~ 23.0 mph) 0 mm/hr
(~ 0 in/hr) 15.0 knots (~ 17.2 mph)
500.0%
Time Coordinates Aircraft
Static Air Pressure Aircraft
Geopotential Height Extrapolated
Surface Pressure D-value Flight Level Wind (30 sec. Avg.) Air Temp. Dew Point Peak (10 sec. Avg.)
Flight Level Wind SFMR
Peak (10s Avg.) Sfc. Wind SFMR
Rain Rate Estimated Surface Wind (30 sec. Avg.)
Using Estimated Reduction Factor Peak Wind at Flight Level to
Est. Surface Reduction Factor
HDOB Observations
Independent Calculations from Tropical Atlantic

At 20:46:30Z (first observation), the observation was 218 miles (350 km) to the S (179°) from Lafayette, LA, USA.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2198. DelawareJack
9:05 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Re: TD6 > Weakening will occur afterwards as the circulation interacts with the mountainous terrain of eastern Mexico and the system should entirely dissipate in 36 to 48 hours...or sooner, not harming the 3 people who will be impacted by this rain.

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2197. DocNDswamp
9:05 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting Skyepony:


The one in the EPAC is now, ironically enough, is 95E. I give the two a chance to combine in to one storm eventually in the EPAC.


Thanks Skye, thought it would be designated an invest soon. Yep, sorta what the GFS is trending toward once TD 6 / AL06 is inland...
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2196. Patrap
9:04 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2195. Articuno
9:04 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2190. Articuno:

that's if it even becomes a ts

even though I do think it will
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2194. HurricaneHunterJoe
9:04 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2166. Grothar:
OH, please!!!

This is what the excitement is all about? Come on, we aren't that desperate yet.



Don't burst their bubbles most wisest of wise :)
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2193. HurricaneAndre
9:03 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2192. Patrap
9:03 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
I discount any post that uses a name on a Model..every time.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2191. Patrap
9:03 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Fujiwara?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2190. Articuno
9:02 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2167. CybrTeddy:
So both Fernand and Dorian fail to get anywhere close to the storms they replaced, lol. Looks like Garbielle will get a good shot at being a significant one this year.

that's if it even becomes a ts
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
2189. txjac
9:01 PM GMT on August 25, 2013
Quoting 2184. redwagon:

Got some clouds in Austin.. But no indication our 30% chance will actually verify.


The clouds are actually a nice respite from the blaring, hot, sun ...I'm enjoying it
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Category 6™

About

Cat 6 lead authors: WU cofounder Dr. Jeff Masters (right), who flew w/NOAA Hurricane Hunters 1986-1990, & WU meteorologist Bob Henson, @bhensonweather