2016 Atlantic Hurricane Season Birdseye Discussion #166

By: NCHurricane2009 , 7:51 AM GMT on November 11, 2016

...FRIDAY NOVEMBER 11 2016 2:52 AM EDT...
The following statement concerns area of interest #1 marked in the western Atlantic in the atmospheric features chart below. As expected a portion of the shortwave upper trough and surface frontal system that recently emerged from eastern North America has amplified into a deep-layered frontal cyclonic system while diving into the western Atlantic longwave upper trough regime that has persisted over the last several days. There is a lack of thunderstorm activity near this frontal cyclone's center...and tropical development is not expected as it will quickly become absorbed by the 982 mb frontal cyclone fast approaching from eastern Canada. This is my final statement on this system on this blog.

The following statement concerns area of interest #2 marked in the eastern Caribbean Sea in the atmospheric features chart below. A review of satellite imagery over the last few days suggests a weak tropical wave has evolved into a small surface tropical low while moving into the Caribbean Sea. This system may develop as it moves into the central Caribbean Sea under a low shear and enhanced upper outflow environment developing in the region as upper ridging is amplifying. Therefore will watch this system over the next few days.

...ATMOSPHERIC FEATURES BIRDSEYE CHART...

This chart is generated based on surface analysis from the National Hurricane Center TAFB at 1800Z and 1947Z-released WPC analysis.

Areas of Interest maybe first introduced circled by a yellow-dashed line. If the area of interest becomes introduced in the 5-day National Hurricane Center (NHC) Atlantic tropical weather outlook then it gets upgraded with a green-dashed line encircling it. If the area of interest gets upgraded to an Invest or is mentioned in the 48-hour NHC Atlantic tropical weather outlook then it gets upgraded with a green-solid polygon encircling it.

In light blue is upper air analysis, with 200 mb wind barbs calculated by GOES satellite imagery showing the upper-level wind direction. Based on the 200 mb wind barbs, blue-dashed lines are locations of upper troughs, blue-zig-zag lines are locations of upper ridges. Blue Ls are locations of upper lows (also called an upper vortex or upper cyclone), blue Hs are locations of upper ridges (also called upper anticyclones).

In red is surface analysis, with solid lines indicating locations of surface fronts, dashed lines indicating locations of surface troughs, and zig-zag lines indicating surface ridge axes. Surface troughs labeled with TW indicates the trough is a tropical wave whose origin is from the mid-level African Easterly Jet. Ls indicate surface lows (cyclones), Hs indicate surface highs (ridges/anticyclones).

...THERMODYNAMICS BIRDSEYE CHART...

This chart is generated using GOES water vapor satellite imagery. Brown indicates dry air. White, blue, and purple indicates moist air. An increase in moisture indicates slower air parcel lapse rates with elevation and hence an increase toward instability.

Sea-surface temperatures are overlaid with light blue isotherms. The 26 deg C isotherm is highlighted in red. Waters at and south of the 26 deg C isotherm indicate low-level warmth and hence faster environmental lapse rates with elevation (more instability). Waters north of the 26 deg C isotherm indicate slower environmental lapse rates with elevation (less instability).


The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

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7:59 AM GMT on November 12, 2016
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