Patrap's WunderBlog

Sacramento Levee Risk,a Disaster in waiting

By: Patrap, 2:10 PM GMT on July 31, 2010



Jan 1 1997 Aerial view of a broken levee and the resultant flooding on the Sacramento River in the Sacramento River delta.


Sacramento Levee & Flood Risk

by Rowena Millado


Sacramento and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta’s risk for flooding is the highest in the country because of the city’s aging levee system that has been inadequately maintained. The River City has even less protection than that of New Orleans despite spending $300 million to strengthen the Sacramento and American rivers levees that has taken place for the past 20 years.

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger declared a state of emergency for California’s levees in February 2006. He executed Executive Order S-01-06 directing agencies to identify, evaluate and repair critical systems. As a result, some critical erosion sites were repaired in 2006, but the underlying structural problem for the Sacramento region and the state remains.

According the Governor’s office, 33 levees have been repaired and 71 additional repairs are scheduled to be completed by September 2007. These repairs essentially retrofit the levees with rocks on its water side to rebuild its slope to original flood level protection.

Although these repairs were done without key federal funding, state representatives and the governor will continue to introduce federal initiatives to underwrite more of the repairs that are needed.

Even residents have taken steps toward greater protection by approving flood assessments for their area, as well as asking the city to cease building new homes in high flood risk areas.

The Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency is recommending some communities to carry flood insurance, even if the homeowner’s lender is not requiring them to do so. The Federal Emergency Management Agency estimates that, over the life of a 30-year mortgage, Downtown, Mid-Town, Oak Park, Natomas, Land Park and East Sacramento neighborhoods face a 26 percent chance of flooding, according to the Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency. Although some property owners will not have to get flood insurance because of the levee repairs in their neighborhood have decreased the risk.

For those neighborhoods who need the insurance, some may still be eligible to receive low-cost preferred flood rates.





1997
Record Flood: The fifth record flood in 46 years occurs over the New Year's holiday. Unprecedented flows from rain and melted snow surge into the Feather and the San Joaquin. Sacramento is spared when the fury of the storm hits 40 miles north in the Feather River. Levee failures flood Olivehurst, Arboga, Wilton, Manteca, and Modesto.


Sacramento Flood History



A Coast Guard helicopter crew rescues a man stranded on the roof of his Olivehurst home on Jan. 3, 1997. A levee along the Feather River ruptured the night before sending acres of water into the Sutter County community.


A neighborhood in the Olivehurst area is lost in a muddy annex of the Feather River on Jan. 3, 1997 after a levee broke the night before.




More Levee Woes and the Suffering included from 1997.



http://www.levees.org

Few people understand what really happened in New Orleans or what caused it. Fewer still realize that they too may be living under a similar or an even greater threat. This video exposes the key myths and misunderstandings about the New Orleans flood.







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Sacramento Levee Risk,a Disaster in waiting

By: Patrap, 2:10 PM GMT on July 31, 2010



Jan 1 1997 Aerial view of a broken levee and the resultant flooding on the Sacramento River in the Sacramento River delta.


Sacramento Levee & Flood Risk

by Rowena Millado


Sacramento and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta’s risk for flooding is the highest in the country because of the city’s aging levee system that has been inadequately maintained. The River City has even less protection than that of New Orleans despite spending $300 million to strengthen the Sacramento and American rivers levees that has taken place for the past 20 years.

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger declared a state of emergency for California’s levees in February 2006. He executed Executive Order S-01-06 directing agencies to identify, evaluate and repair critical systems. As a result, some critical erosion sites were repaired in 2006, but the underlying structural problem for the Sacramento region and the state remains.

According the Governor’s office, 33 levees have been repaired and 71 additional repairs are scheduled to be completed by September 2007. These repairs essentially retrofit the levees with rocks on its water side to rebuild its slope to original flood level protection.

Although these repairs were done without key federal funding, state representatives and the governor will continue to introduce federal initiatives to underwrite more of the repairs that are needed.

Even residents have taken steps toward greater protection by approving flood assessments for their area, as well as asking the city to cease building new homes in high flood risk areas.

The Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency is recommending some communities to carry flood insurance, even if the homeowner’s lender is not requiring them to do so. The Federal Emergency Management Agency estimates that, over the life of a 30-year mortgage, Downtown, Mid-Town, Oak Park, Natomas, Land Park and East Sacramento neighborhoods face a 26 percent chance of flooding, according to the Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency. Although some property owners will not have to get flood insurance because of the levee repairs in their neighborhood have decreased the risk.

For those neighborhoods who need the insurance, some may still be eligible to receive low-cost preferred flood rates.





1997
Record Flood: The fifth record flood in 46 years occurs over the New Year's holiday. Unprecedented flows from rain and melted snow surge into the Feather and the San Joaquin. Sacramento is spared when the fury of the storm hits 40 miles north in the Feather River. Levee failures flood Olivehurst, Arboga, Wilton, Manteca, and Modesto.


Sacramento Flood History



A Coast Guard helicopter crew rescues a man stranded on the roof of his Olivehurst home on Jan. 3, 1997. A levee along the Feather River ruptured the night before sending acres of water into the Sutter County community.


A neighborhood in the Olivehurst area is lost in a muddy annex of the Feather River on Jan. 3, 1997 after a levee broke the night before.




More Levee Woes and the Suffering included from 1997.



http://www.levees.org

Few people understand what really happened in New Orleans or what caused it. Fewer still realize that they too may be living under a similar or an even greater threat. This video exposes the key myths and misunderstandings about the New Orleans flood.







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The Mad Potter of Biloxi

By: Patrap, 10:06 AM GMT on July 23, 2010

The Mad Potter of Biloxi






Self-styled eccentric George E. Ohr's wild, weird, wonderful pots gathered dust in a garage for half a century.

Now architect Frank Gehry is designing a museum dedicated to the artist who made them

* By Bruce Watson
* Smithsonian magazine, February 2004


The Mad Potter of Biloxi



Riding the train south through the deep pine woods of Mississippi in the early 1880s, tourists to the Gulf Coast came to Biloxi for sunshine and surf. Along with its beaches, the little town had its own opera house, white streets paved with crushed oyster shells, and fine seafood. Yet back in those years, there were no casinos as there are now, and not a lot to do besides swim, stroll and eat shrimp. Then, in the 1890s, the town boasted a new tourist attraction, one based on genius or madness, depending on one’s point of view.





Just a few blocks from shore, a five-story wooden “pagoda” labeled “BILOXI ARTPOTTERY” towered above the train tracks that ran across Delauney Street. Approaching it, a visitor saw hand-lettered signs. One read: “Get a Biloxi Souvenir, Before the Potter Dies, or Gets a Reputation.” Another proclaimed: “Unequaled unrivaled—undisputed— GREATEST ARTPOTTERON THE EARTH.” Stepping inside, a curious tourist found a studio overflowing with pots. But they were not your garden variety. These pots featured rims that had been crumpled like the edges of a burlap bag. Alongside them were pitchers that seemed deliberately twisted and vases warped as if melted in the kiln. And colors! In contrast to the boring beiges of Victorian ceramics, these works exploded with color—vivid reds juxtaposed with gunmetal grays; olive greens splattered across bright oranges; royal blues mottled on mustard yellows. The entire studio seemed like some mad potter’s hallucination, and standing in the middle of it all was the mad potter himself.





Viewed from a distance across his cluttered shop, George Ohr didn’t look mad. With his huge arms folded across his dirty apron, he looked more blacksmith than potter. But as they got a bit closer, customers could glimpse the 18-inch mustache he had wrapped around his cheeks and tied behind his head. And there was something in Ohr’s eyes—dark, piercing and wild—that suggested, at the very least, advanced eccentricity. If the pots and the man’s appearance did not prove lunacy, his prices did. He wanted $25—the equivalent of about $500 today—for a crumpled pot with wacky handles. “No two alike,” he boasted, but to most customers each looked as weird as the next. No wonder that as the new century began, thousands of the colorful, misshapen works collected dust on Ohr’s shelves, leaving the potter mad, indeed, at a world that failed to appreciate him. “I have a notion . . . that I am a mistake,” he said in an interview in 1901. Yet he predicted, “When I am gone, my work will be praised, honored, and cherished. It will come.”






Some 85 years after his death, the self-styled “Mad Potter of Biloxi” will be praised and honored as he predicted. Two years from now, Ohr’s startling ceramics will be showcased in a new $25 million Biloxi arts center designed by architect Frank O. Gehry, whose swirling silver Guggenheim Museum put Bilbao, Spain, on the cultural map. The Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is named in honor of former Biloxi mayor Jeremiah O’Keefe and his late wife, Annette. Their family’s $1 million gift helped establish the museum, now housed in a small building downtown, in 1998. The new facility, scheduled to be completed in January 2006, will be nestled in a four-acre grove of live oaks overlooking the Gulf. As America’s first museum dedicated to a single potter, the complex will call attention to an art more often seen as craft. And if yet another story of “an artist ahead of his time” sounds clichéd, the resurgence of George Ohr will cap one of the art world’s most remarkable comebacks. For although his work is now in such museums as New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, until the late 1970s, the only place to see an Ohr pot was in a garage behind a Biloxi auto shop—in a crate.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/biloxi.html#ixzz0uoxFw6XM





A short form promotional documentary about the Ohr Museum of Art in Biloxi, MS, a structure designed by world famous architect, Frank Gehry. The Museum will house the pottery of world famous turn-of-the-century potter, George Ohr - a Biloxi Native. Directed - Shot - Edited by Garrett A Merchant garrettmerchant.com

For more info visit georgeohr.org







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Tranquility Base Here,The Eagle has Landed

By: Patrap, 5:09 AM GMT on July 20, 2010

Man had Landed on the Moon.



Back of Eagle photographed By Neil Armstrong


But what isnt well known by millions alive then and today,

is that is was close.


Closer than a "wings wiggle to Flame".



Mike Collins,Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were and are today the First Humans to return from Lunar Orbit with something they didnt leave with from Earth.



That Box o rocks under their couches firmly strapped in when they Splash downed in the Command Module July 24th in the warm Pacific Ocean.


But it was a geek.

A Lil known engineer who saved the Mission during the critical Powered descent of the lunar Module.



As Neil and Buzz were coming down..they already had experienced some problems as they began powered descent.

The Comm link wasnt good,,so they were relaying the LEM's Signal thru Columbia and Mike Collins to Houston Via the Hi-Gain Steerable Antenna on Columbia Orbiting above.




Then Neil Noticed his Landmarks were coming a tad early in the window.

"Neil iz that good ?",Buzz thought to Himself.

He's a engineer and a Pilot as well.

Buzz was relaying Altitude and Forward speed to Neil Watching over the Systems and then it Happened.


"Bomp,Bomp MASTER ALARM"..!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


"..itsa 1201.."





Whats a 1201?, was collectively passed around the Loops.

An error in procedural protocol went undetected during simulations and during the final descent of Apollo 11. This led to a switch in the lunar landing module (LM) being set to the wrong position.
As a result, (and unknown to anyone at the time), the onboard guidance computer was needlessly processing data from the rendezvous radar.

Then, as the LM descended, its separate landing radar acquired the lunar surface. Now processing data from two radars instead of only one as intended, the computer's duty cycle grew heavier than expected and a series of "1202" and "1201" alarms began signalling an executive overflow, meaning that the computer did not have enough time to execute all tasks so lower priority tasks were being dropped.

Several seconds after the first alarm Neil Armstrong, with some concern apparent in his voice said, "Give us a reading on the 1202 program alarm." Meanwhile, given his knowledge of the computer systems, Garman had already advised Steve Bales the computer could be relied upon to function adequately so long as the alarms did not become continuous.

Bales, who as guidance officer had to quickly decide whether to abort the mission over these alarms, trusted Garman's judgement and informed flight director Kranz. Within seconds this decision was relayed through CAPCOM to the astronauts, Apollo 11 landed successfully and Garman received an award from NASA for his role in the mission.

Bales later recalled, "Quite frankly, Jack, who had these things memorized said, 'that's okay', before I could even remember which group it was in

Bales' decision as GUIDO to go ahead with the landing was appropriate and Apollo 11 landed safely. When President Richard Nixon awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom to the three Apollo 11 astronauts, Steve Bales was also honored by being chosen to accept a NASA Group Achievement Award on behalf of the entire mission operations team. Nixon said at the time, "This is the young man, when the computers seemed to be confused and when he could have said "Stop", or when he could have said "Wait", said, "Go"."


An error in procedural protocol went undetected during simulations and during the final descent of Apollo 11. This led to a switch in the lunar landing module (LM) being set to the wrong position. As a result, (and unknown to anyone at the time), the onboard guidance computer was needlessly processing data from the rendezvous radar. Then, as the LM descended, its separate landing radar acquired the lunar surface. Now processing data from two radars instead of only one as intended, the computer's duty cycle grew heavier than expected and a series of "1202" and "1201" alarms began signalling an executive overflow, meaning that the computer did not have enough time to execute all tasks so lower priority tasks were being dropped. Several seconds after the first alarm Neil Armstrong, with some concern apparent in his voice said, "Give us a reading on the 1202 program alarm." Meanwhile, given his knowledge of the computer systems, Garman had already advised Steve Bales the computer could be relied upon to function adequately so long as the alarms did not become continuous.[1] Bales, who as guidance officer had to quickly decide whether to abort the mission over these alarms, trusted Garman's judgement and informed flight director Kranz. Within seconds this decision was relayed through CAPCOM to the astronauts, Apollo 11 landed successfully and Garman received an award from NASA for his role in the mission.

Bales later recalled, "Quite frankly, Jack, who had these things memorized said, 'that's okay', before I could even remember which group it was in


What is a 1201 Alarm, Anyway?

On July 20, 1969, as the Apollo 11 lunar module (the first
manned lunar landing) was descending, the computerized guidance system began repeatedly reporting a “1201 alarm.”

The computer¹s most vital function during this critical phase of the mission, determining the altitude and position of the craft, suffered a serious disruption. Because of a mistake in the astronauts' checklist, equipment was continuously operating when it should have been inactive, consuming too much of the computer’s processing capacity.

This mistake created delays in some guidance calculations while leaving others unfinished. Had the 1201 alarm—a warning that the computer’s calculations were off and could not be trusted—not gone off, the lunar module likely would have crash-landed in a field of boulders, and astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong would have perished.

1201 Alarm Press views this near-catastrophic event as analogous to the human condition called Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD), in which the brain is misprocessing information and causing problematic behavior, but often so subtly that it appears to be functioning normally.



So HAL almost caused the Abort.


Creepy Huh?

It gets better.

Apollo 11: 25 Years Later
by Fred H. Martin, Intermetrics, Inc.
July 1994
Copyright © 1994 by Fred H. Martin.
All rights reserved.
Used with permission.

25 years ago it happened - the first Lunar Landing, Apollo 11 - July 20, 1969. It was an exciting, exhilarating time of total focus and dedication. Current and alumni Intermetrics employees were intimately involved with the project since its inception in 1960 (John Miller, Jim Miller, Ed Copps, Jim Flanders, Dan Lickly, Joe Saponaro, Bill Widnall, John Green, Alex Kosmala, Ray Morth, Steve Copps, and me, Fred Martin). The most memorable part of the flight for me, aside from the landing and the moon-walk itself, was the descent from lunar orbit to the surface. I'd like to present a personal remembrance and perspective.

I was at that time the Deputy Director of the Mission Development Group under Dr. Richard Battin, a pioneer in modern astronautical guidance. The M.I.T. Instrumentation Laboratory ("the Lab") was responsible for the Apollo Guidance and Navigation System; we had designed and implemented all of the on-board software for both the Command and Service Module (CSM) and the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM).

On July 20th we all gathered in a large open conference room at the Lab, as we had for previous flights to listen and follow the progress of the flight. M.I.T. personnel actively supported each flight, 24 hours a day, by stationing expert engineers on-line linked to NASA's Manned Space Center (now JSC) in Houston. We waited with anticipation, pride and apprehensiveness as the LEM began its descent toward the lunar surface. As the vehicle approached the target, one of the astronauts, Buzz Aldrin I believe, announced that the on-board computer just displayed a "1202 alarm".

They were confused by the alarm and appealed to the Houston controllers for help. In the meantime the descent proceeded normally. The computer alarms were buried deep within the executive software and really weren't meant for user recognition. The alarms continued to appear at intervals of approximately 10 seconds. Everyone was tense and anxious. The M.I.T. software people and their NASA counterparts knew that the computer was signaling overloaded executive job queues, and the potential loss of execution of certain tasks. But, we could not figure out, in real time, the immediate danger, the consequences for the mission, nor how in the world such a remote alarm could have been caused in the first place. I had never seen one or heard of one in all of our pre-flight testing.

We scrambled to understand and advise Houston. Should the Descent be aborted? Should the Guidance System be pulled off-line in favor of the primitive AGS (Abort Guidance System)? Cool NASA heads at MSC kept control and our most knowledgeable NASA software engineer, Jack Garman, advised the Mission Controller to inform the astronauts to push on. Jack was convinced, in a split second, that if the computer wasn't getting to certain computations, such algorithms were not essential and would not materially affect the landing. It was a gutsy call. He was right and the LEM landed safely. Now the fun began.

It wasn't 10 seconds after the LEM was secured on the surface that NASA was on the phones to the Lab. This was the Lab's responsibility, our system, our machine, our alarms. "What were those alarms? We're launching in 24 hours and we're not going with alarms. We must have an operational computer." We really went to work. The computer seemed to be operating at 80% of its normal speed, but why?

We turned to our simulation facilities. We had a high-fidelity digital simulation of the computer and the executing programs, surrounded by a digital simulation of the LEM vehicle, the equations of motion, and the gravitational environment. We also had an analog simulator with the real guidance computer, the inertial measurement unit (IMU), and a man-in-the loop. We tried every anomalous condition. We examined the executive code, the alarm mechanism, and the fundamental algorithms. We worked all night and time was running short. Our NASA buddies called us every 15-30 minutes anticipating, demanding a solution. We had to find it. We re-covered old ground, new ground, brainstorms, crazy ideas, anything.

I remember bumping into one of our M.I.T. engineers, George Silver, who was usually at our office at Cape Kennedy. George had been involved in and witnessed many pre-flight tests. I asked him in frustration if he had ever seen the Apollo Guidance Computer run slowly and under what conditions. To my surprise and rather matter of fact, he said he had. He called it "cycle stealing" and he said it can occur when the I/O system keeps looking for data. He had seen it when the Rendezvous Radar Switch was on (in the AUTO position) and the computer was looking for radar data. He asked "the Switch isn't on, is it?" "Why would it be on for Descent, it's meant for Ascent?"

I rushed upstairs and suggested we look at the telemetry data. Some of the M.I.T engineers found the telemetry print out, found the correct 16-bit packed word, found the correct bit, and... yikes!!!, the bit was ON. Why was it on? It had to be set in that position by an astronaut. We looked at the 4 inch thick book of astronaut procedures and there it was -- they were supposed to put in on (in the AUTO position) prior to Descent. The computer had been looking for radar data. If the astronauts were trained this way, why had this effort never shown during training sessions? (I later found out that such training was for procedures only and the Switch was never connected to a real computer.)

But there was no time now for analyses or reflections. We called Houston and delivered the cause and solution. The final countdown to Ascent was proceeding. Just before ignition, and the last message sent to the astronauts, Glenn Lunney, the Flight Director, calmly told the astronauts to "please put the Rendezvous Radar Switch in the Manual position".

The Ascent and flight proceeded without incident.




Software Engineering Postscript
The Apollo program took some heat for this "software error" that almost caused Apollo 11 to abort. At M.I.T., we always thought and most would still maintain that the system operated as designed and saved the flight. We used a priority driven executive, rather than a round robin, FIFO, or table division executive. We provided for overload, or loss of computer speed, by continuing to execute the highest priority jobs. Those jobs (tasks) that fell off the queue were of lowest priority, perhaps a display refresh or some other non-essential procedure. Had we demanded computer time for every schedule task, then time would have run out, tasks would have overlapped, data would be confused and out of sync, and the flight would have been lost. Interestingly, this experience so influenced NASA's Jack Gorman and other NASA and Intermetrics software engineers, that we fought long and hard to retain a priority, asynchronous executive for Shuttle as manifested in the HAL/S language.

The on-board Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) was about 1 cubic foot with 2K of 16-bit RAM and 36K of hard-wired core-rope memory with copper wires threaded or not threaded through tiny magnetic cores. The 16-bit words were generally 14 bits of data (or two op-codes), 1 sign bit, and 1 parity bit. The cycle time was 11.7 micro-seconds. Programming was done in assembly language and in an interpretive language, in reverse Polish. Scaling was fixed point fractional. An assembly language ADD took about 23.4 micro-seconds. The operating system featured a multi-programmed, priority/event driven asynchronous executive packed into 2K of memory. The Mean Time to Failure (MTBF) of the machine in a space environment was calculated at 50,000 hours -- almost 6 years, and it never failed in flight operations. It was truly a marvel for its time, a tribute to M.I.T.'s designers, and it accomplished a most complex mission.

So Here is how it went...41 years ago this afternoon.

July 20th 1969


We sure didnt know all this had occurred when it happened.

But the "pucker factor" that day caused a lot of Tide Detergent used post landing day,In Houston and MIT Im told from sources I cant name to this day.


.."We Came in Peace for ALL mankind"..









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Fly me to the Moon,,

By: Patrap, 2:22 AM GMT on July 16, 2010



The Saturn 5 Looms Large on the Horizon with over a million people camped out on the beach,in Packed Hotels..and sleeping in Volkswagon's or the ever popular pop-up campers.



Today,..Man leaves the Earth to Land and walk on the Moon.
And it seemed as if all of Florida and America had showed up to watch it Blast off.
They used to say Blast off still,in 69.

The air was Magical..surreal even on TV.
This was it. Neil,Mike and Buzz were going all the way. Apollo 8 had orbited the Moon Christmas Day 68.
Apollo 9 had checked out the LEM in Earth orbit.
And Apollo 10 in May took the LEM down to within 50,000 ft of the Lunar Surface.
Now the Day is here.
For a Nine year old,..Im up early,4am CST here in New Orleans.
I have been awaiting this day for all my Living memory,..only sidetracked briefly by Hurricane Betsy in enormity in my young life.

I had the Saturn 5 Model sitting on the Coffee table.
Tea and cinnamon toast. Maybe some Tang for all I can remember.
Walter Cronkite was talking away.







For one moment..we all seem to pause,and acknowledge the Enormity of what was about to Happen.
This is how it was that morning..Live on TV as it happened.



One week,when the World paused,and as one..prayed for the Men,and marveled at what we could do.

"For All Mankind"..


The Apollo 11 Crew Leaving the Crew Quarters for a Trip to the Moon.


Please feel free to leave your own personal memories of that week in 69,..or how it was remembered by your Family.




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Rising Tide 5

By: Patrap, 2:42 PM GMT on July 09, 2010

BREAKING NEWS

The BOP Stack VALVES have stopped the Oil flow.

The Choke Line valve is closed 100%

FLASH TRAFFIC


Live feeds from the Gulf of Mexico ROVs





Rising Tide 5

Rising Tide NOLA, Inc. will present its 5th annual new media conference centered on the recovery and future of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast on Saturday, August 28, 2010, 9:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M., at The Howlin' Wolf, 907 South Peters Street in New Orleans.

Conference registration is open online and is only $20 until July 31. Registration includes lunch. There will be a pre-conference party hosted by New Orleans Bloggers on Friday evening, August 27, also at The Howlin' Wolf.

More information is available at the Rising Tide 5 Website and the Rising Tide Blog. You can also connect with Rising Tide on Twitter and Facebook or call 1.888.910.2055.


Please feel free to forward this email and to reply with comments, questions, suggestions or to request removal from our mailing list.

We look forward to seeing you at Rising Tide 5.

Thank you,

RT5 Organizers

The Rising Tide Conference is an annual gathering for all who wish to learn more and do more to assist New Orleans' recovery. It's for everyone who loves New Orleans and is working to bring a better future to all its residents.

Leveraging the power of bloggers and new media, the conference is a launch pad for organization and action. Our day-long program of speakers and presentations is tailored to inform, entertain, enrage and inspire.
We come together to dispel myths, promote facts, highlight progress and regress, discuss recovery ideas, and promote sound policies at all levels. We aim to be a "real life" demonstration of internet activism as we continue to recover from a massive failure of government on all levels.
SPONSORS
3-Year Sustaining Sponsor

Past featured speakers have included Harry Shearer (writer, actor, host of the weekly radio show Le Show), John Barry (author of Rising Tide), Dave Zirin (author of Welcome to the Terrordome) and authors Christopher Cooper and Robert Block (Disaster: Hurricane Katrina and the Failure of Homeland Security).

Rising Tide started in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and the subsequent flooding of the city when a small group of New Orleans-based bloggers decided to expand their on-line advocacy for the rebirth of New Orleans into a public event.
Participants are encouraged to Blog, Twitter, Facebook and otherwise connect and share with others in attendance and around the world. The goals of Rising Tide are numerous, but are briefly:

* We seek to protect and preserve the cultural qualities of New Orleans that make our city unique.

* We resolve to root out and expose the corruption and incompetence that harms us all.

* We work to enact a vision of a restored and resilient community that respects traditions and reaches for a sustainable future for all citizens.

Join us as we map out the course of this great city now and into the future!

We have a Rising Tide 5 group rate at the Marriott Springhill Suites Hotel across the street from our conference venue, The Howlin' Wolf (map).

Thursday night, 8/26 through Sunday night, 8/29 the Rising Tide rate is $79.00 per night.
This offer is valid until August 9 and subject to availability.
The Rate applies to rooms with 1 king bed or 2 double beds, both with sleeper sofas.
Double rooms sleep 6 and King rooms sleep 4.
All rooms are "suites" with a sitting room/office area, microwave and refrigerator.
The hotel has an outdoor swimming pool.

Telephone 1.888.364.1200 to make reservations or reserve online: Single or Double.



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2010 Hurricane Preparation

By: Patrap, 1:14 PM GMT on July 01, 2010









Evacuation Considerations for the Elderly, Disabled and Special Medical Care Issues

Your Evacuation Plan


Disaster Supplies Kit


NOAA Alert Weather Radio's


"Think outside the Cone"
hurricanebuddy.com






History teaches that a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. By knowing your vulnerability and what actions you should take, you can reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster.

5
HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS TIPS



Hurricane hazards come in many forms: storm surge, high winds, tornadoes, and flooding. This means it is important for your family to have a plan that includes all of these hazards. Look carefully at the safety actions associated with each type of hurricane hazard and prepare your family disaster plan accordingly. But remember this is only a guide. The first and most important thing anyone should do when facing a hurricane threat is to use common sense.

You should be able to answer the following questions before a hurricane threatens:

*
What are the Hurricane Hazards?
*
What does it mean to you?
*
What actions should you take to be prepared?

Hurricanes and Your Health and Safety


* The great majority of injuries during a hurricane are cuts caused by flying glass or other debris. Other injuries include puncture wounds resulting from exposed nails, metal, or glass, and bone fractures.
* State and local health departments may issue health advisories or recommendations particular to local conditions. If in doubt, contact your local or state health department.
* Make sure to include all essential medications -- both prescription and over the counter -- in your family's emergency disaster kit.


* Hurricanes, especially if accompanied by a tidal surge or flooding, can contaminate the public water supply. Drinking contaminated water may cause illness. You cannot assume that the water in the hurricane-affected area is safe to drink.
* In the area hit by a hurricane, water treatment plants may not be operating; even if they are, storm damage and flooding can contaminate water lines. Listen for public announcements about the safety of the municipal water supply.
* If your well has been flooded, it needs to be tested and disinfected after the storm passes and the floodwaters recede. Questions about testing should be directed to your local or state health department.

Water Safety

* Use bottled water that has not been exposed to flood waters if it is available.
* If you don't have bottled water, you should boil water to make it safe. Boiling water will kill most types of disease-causing organisms that may be present. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for boiling. Boil the water for one minute, let it cool, and store it in clean containers with covers.
* If you can't boil water, you can disinfect it using household bleach. Bleach will kill some, but not all, types of disease-causing organisms that may be in the water. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for disinfection. Add 1/8 teaspoon (or 8 drops) of regular, unscented, liquid household bleach for each gallon of water, stir it well and let it stand for 30 minutes before you use it. Store disinfected water in clean containers with covers.
* If you have a well that has been flooded, the water should be tested and disinfected after flood waters recede. If you suspect that your well may be contaminated, contact your local or state health department or agriculture extension agent for specific advice.

Food Safety

* Do not eat any food that may have come into contact with flood water.
* Discard any food that is not in a waterproof container if there is any chance that it has come into contact with flood water. Food containers that are not waterproof include those with screw-caps, snap lids, pull tops, and crimped caps. Also, discard cardboard juice/milk/baby formula boxes and home canned foods if they have come in contact with flood water, because they cannot be effectively cleaned and sanitized.
* Inspect canned foods and discard any food in damaged cans. Can damage is shown by swelling; leakage; punctures; holes; fractures; extensive deep rusting; or crushing/denting severe enough to prevent normal stacking or opening with a manual, wheel-type can opener.
* Undamaged, commercially prepared foods in all-metal cans and retort pouches (for example, flexible, shelf-stable juice or seafood pouches) can be saved if you do the following:
o Remove the labels, if they are the removable kind, since they can harbor dirt and bacteria.
o Thoroughly wash the cans or retort pouches with soap and water, using hot water if it is available.
o Brush or wipe away any dirt or silt.
o Rinse the cans or retort pouches with water that is safe for drinking, if available, since dirt or residual soap will reduce the effectiveness of chlorine sanitation.
o Then, sanitize them by immersion in one of the two following ways:
+ place in water and allow the water to come to a boil and continue boiling for 2 minutes, or
+ place in a freshly-made solution consisting of 1 tablespoon of unscented liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available) for 15 minutes.
* Air dry cans or retort pouches for a minimum of 1 hour before opening or storing.
* If the labels were removable, then re-label your cans or retort pouches, including the expiration date (if available), with a marker.
* Food in reconditioned cans or retort pouches should be used as soon as possible, thereafter.
* Any concentrated baby formula in reconditioned, all-metal containers must be diluted with clean, drinking water.
* Thoroughly wash metal pans, ceramic dishes, and utensils (including can openers) with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize them by boiling in clean water or immersing them for 15 minutes in a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available).
* Thoroughly wash countertops with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize by applying a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available). Allow to air dry.

Frozen and Refrigerated Foods

* If you will be without power for a long period:
o ask friends to store your frozen foods in their freezers if they have electricity;
o see if freezer space is available in a store, church, school, or commercial freezer that has electrical service; or
o use dry ice, if available. Twenty-five pounds of dry ice will keep a ten-cubic-foot freezer below freezing for 3-4 days. Use care when handling dry ice, and wear dry, heavy gloves to avoid injury.
* Your refrigerator will keep foods cool for about four hours without power if it is unopened. Add block or dry ice to your refrigerator if the electricity will be off longer than four hours.
* Thawed food can usually be eaten if it is still "refrigerator cold," or re-frozen if it still contains ice crystals.
* To be safe, remember, "When in doubt, throw it out." Discard any food that has been at room temperature for two hours or more, and any food that has an unusual odor, color, or texture.

Sanitation and Hygiene

It is critical for you to remember to practice basic hygiene during the emergency period. Always wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected:

* before preparing or eating
* after toilet use
* after participating in cleanup activities; and
* after handling articles contaminated with floodwater or sewage.

If there is flooding along with a hurricane, the waters may contain fecal material from overflowing sewage systems and agricultural and industrial waste. Although skin contact with floodwater does not, by itself, pose a serious health risk, there is risk of disease from eating or drinking anything contaminated with floodwater.

If you have any open cuts or sores that will be exposed to floodwater, keep them as clean as possible by washing them with soap and applying an antibiotic ointment to discourage infection. If a wound develops redness, swelling, or drainage, seek immediate medical attention.

Do not allow children to play in floodwater areas. Wash children's hands frequently (always before meals), and do not allow children to play with floodwater-contaminated toys that have not been disinfected. You can disinfect toys using a solution of one cup of bleach in five gallons of water.

Immunizations

Outbreaks of communicable diseases after hurricanes are unusual. However, the rates of diseases that were present before a hurricane may increase because of a lack of sanitation or overcrowding in shelters. Increases in infectious diseases that were not present before the hurricane are not a problem, so mass vaccination programs are unnecessary.

If you have wounds, you should be evaluated for a tetanus immunization, just as you would at any other time of injury. If you receive a puncture wound or a wound contaminated with feces, soil, or saliva, have a doctor or health department determine whether a tetanus booster is necessary based on individual records.

Specific recommendations for vaccinations should be made on a case-by-case basis, or as determined by local and state health departments.

Mosquitoes

Rain and flooding in a hurricane area may lead to an increase in mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are most active at sunrise and sunset. In most cases, the mosquitoes will be pests but will not carry communicable diseases. It is unlikely that diseases which were not present in the area prior to the hurricane would be of concern. Local, state, and federal public health authorities will be actively working to control the spread of any mosquito-borne diseases.

To protect yourself from mosquitoes, use screens on dwellings, and wear clothes with long sleeves and long pants. Insect repellents that contain DEET are very effective. Be sure to read all instructions before using DEET. Care must be taken when using DEET on small children. Products containing DEET are available from stores and through local and state health departments.

To control mosquito populations, drain all standing water left in open containers outside your home.

Mental Health

The days and weeks after a hurricane are going to be rough. In addition to your physical health, you need to take some time to consider your mental health as well. Remember that some sleeplessness, anxiety, anger, hyperactivity, mild depression, or lethargy are normal, and may go away with time. If you feel any of these symptoms acutely, seek counseling. Remember that children need extra care and attention before, during, and after the storm. Be sure to locate a favorite toy or game for your child before the storm arrives to help maintain his/her sense of security. Your state and local health departments will help you find the local resources, including hospitals or health care providers, that you may need.

Seeking Assistance after a Hurricane

SEEKING DISASTER ASSISTANCE: Throughout the recovery period, it is important to monitor local radio or television reports and other media sources for information about where to get emergency housing, food, first aid, clothing, and financial assistance. The following section provides general information about the kinds of assistance that may be available.

DIRECT ASSISTANCE: Direct assistance to individuals and families may come from any number of organizations, including: the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army, and other volunteer organizations. These organizations provide food, shelter, supplies and assist in clean-up efforts.

THE FEDERAL ROLE: In the most severe disasters, the federal government is also called in to help individuals and families with temporary housing, counseling (for post-disaster trauma), low-interest loans and grants, and other assistance. The federal government also has programs that help small businesses and farmers.

Most federal assistance becomes available when the President of the United States declares a Major Disaster for the affected area at the request of a state governor. FEMA will provide information through the media and community outreach about federal assistance and how to apply.

Coping after a Hurricane Everyone who sees or experiences a hurricane is affected by it in some way. It is normal to feel anxious about your own safety and that of your family and close friends. Profound sadness, grief, and anger are normal reactions to an abnormal event. Acknowledging your feelings helps you recover. Focusing on your strengths and abilities helps you heal. Accepting help from community programs and resources is healthy. Everyone has different needs and different ways of coping. It is common to want to strike back at people who have caused great pain. Children and older adults are of special concern in the aftermath of disasters. Even individuals who experience a disaster �second hand� through exposure to extensive media coverage can be affected.

Contact local faith-based organizations, voluntary agencies, or professional counselors for counseling. Additionally, FEMA and state and local governments of the affected area may provide crisis counseling assistance.

Minimize this emotional and traumatic experience by being prepared, not scared and therefore you and your family will stay in control and survive a major hurricane.

SIGNS OF HURRICANE RELATED STRESS:

* Difficulty communicating thoughts.
* Difficulty sleeping.
* Difficulty maintaining balance in their lives.
* Low threshold of frustration.
* Increased use of drugs/alcohol.
* Limited attention span.
* Poor work performance.
* Headaches/stomach problems.
* Tunnel vision/muffled hearing.
* Colds or flu-like symptoms.
* Disorientation or confusion.
* Difficulty concentrating.
* Reluctance to leave home.
* Depression, sadness.
* Feelings of hopelessness.
* Mood-swings and easy bouts of crying.
* Overwhelming guilt and self-doubt.
* Fear of crowds, strangers, or being alone.

EASING HURRICANE RELATED STRESS:

* Talk with someone about your feelings - anger, sorrow, and other emotions - even though it may be difficult.
* Seek help from professional counselors who deal with post-disaster stress.
* Do not hold yourself responsible for the disastrous event or be frustrated because you feel you cannot help directly in the rescue work.
* Take steps to promote your own physical and emotional healing by healthy eating, rest, exercise, relaxation, and meditation.
* Maintain a normal family and daily routine, limiting demanding responsibilities on yourself and your family.
* Spend time with family and friends.
* Participate in memorials.
* Use existing support groups of family, friends, and religious institutions.
* Ensure you are ready for future events by restocking your disaster supplies kits and updating your family disaster plans.

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The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.