Hurricane Preparation..

By: Patrap , 8:54 PM GMT on August 03, 2008

Hurricane Preparation

Naval Safety Center
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LT Jason Dalby, VFA-86

With hurricane season upon us again, it's time to dust off that family disaster plan, or in many cases, create one. Keeping your family safe during a hurricane starts with proper planning. One in six Americans live along the eastern seaboard or the Gulf of Mexico, making hurricane preparation a must for many and their families.








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History teaches that a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. By knowing your vulnerability and what actions you should take, you can reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster.

5
HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS TIPS



Hurricane hazards come in many forms: storm surge, high winds, tornadoes, and flooding. This means it is important for your family to have a plan that includes all of these hazards. Look carefully at the safety actions associated with each type of hurricane hazard and prepare your family disaster plan accordingly. But remember this is only a guide. The first and most important thing anyone should do when facing a hurricane threat is to use common sense.

You should be able to answer the following questions before a hurricane threatens:

*
What are the Hurricane Hazards?
*
What does it mean to you?
*
What actions should you take to be prepared?

Hurricanes and Your Health and Safety


* The great majority of injuries during a hurricane are cuts caused by flying glass or other debris. Other injuries include puncture wounds resulting from exposed nails, metal, or glass, and bone fractures.
* State and local health departments may issue health advisories or recommendations particular to local conditions. If in doubt, contact your local or state health department.
* Make sure to include all essential medications -- both prescription and over the counter -- in your family's emergency disaster kit.


* Hurricanes, especially if accompanied by a tidal surge or flooding, can contaminate the public water supply. Drinking contaminated water may cause illness. You cannot assume that the water in the hurricane-affected area is safe to drink.
* In the area hit by a hurricane, water treatment plants may not be operating; even if they are, storm damage and flooding can contaminate water lines. Listen for public announcements about the safety of the municipal water supply.
* If your well has been flooded, it needs to be tested and disinfected after the storm passes and the floodwaters recede. Questions about testing should be directed to your local or state health department.

Water Safety

* Use bottled water that has not been exposed to flood waters if it is available.
* If you don't have bottled water, you should boil water to make it safe. Boiling water will kill most types of disease-causing organisms that may be present. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for boiling. Boil the water for one minute, let it cool, and store it in clean containers with covers.
* If you can't boil water, you can disinfect it using household bleach. Bleach will kill some, but not all, types of disease-causing organisms that may be in the water. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for disinfection. Add 1/8 teaspoon (or 8 drops) of regular, unscented, liquid household bleach for each gallon of water, stir it well and let it stand for 30 minutes before you use it. Store disinfected water in clean containers with covers.
* If you have a well that has been flooded, the water should be tested and disinfected after flood waters recede. If you suspect that your well may be contaminated, contact your local or state health department or agriculture extension agent for specific advice.

Food Safety

* Do not eat any food that may have come into contact with flood water.
* Discard any food that is not in a waterproof container if there is any chance that it has come into contact with flood water. Food containers that are not waterproof include those with screw-caps, snap lids, pull tops, and crimped caps. Also, discard cardboard juice/milk/baby formula boxes and home canned foods if they have come in contact with flood water, because they cannot be effectively cleaned and sanitized.
* Inspect canned foods and discard any food in damaged cans. Can damage is shown by swelling; leakage; punctures; holes; fractures; extensive deep rusting; or crushing/denting severe enough to prevent normal stacking or opening with a manual, wheel-type can opener.
* Undamaged, commercially prepared foods in all-metal cans and retort pouches (for example, flexible, shelf-stable juice or seafood pouches) can be saved if you do the following:
o Remove the labels, if they are the removable kind, since they can harbor dirt and bacteria.
o Thoroughly wash the cans or retort pouches with soap and water, using hot water if it is available.
o Brush or wipe away any dirt or silt.
o Rinse the cans or retort pouches with water that is safe for drinking, if available, since dirt or residual soap will reduce the effectiveness of chlorine sanitation.
o Then, sanitize them by immersion in one of the two following ways:
+ place in water and allow the water to come to a boil and continue boiling for 2 minutes, or
+ place in a freshly-made solution consisting of 1 tablespoon of unscented liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available) for 15 minutes.
* Air dry cans or retort pouches for a minimum of 1 hour before opening or storing.
* If the labels were removable, then re-label your cans or retort pouches, including the expiration date (if available), with a marker.
* Food in reconditioned cans or retort pouches should be used as soon as possible, thereafter.
* Any concentrated baby formula in reconditioned, all-metal containers must be diluted with clean, drinking water.
* Thoroughly wash metal pans, ceramic dishes, and utensils (including can openers) with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize them by boiling in clean water or immersing them for 15 minutes in a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available).
* Thoroughly wash countertops with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize by applying a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available). Allow to air dry.

Frozen and Refrigerated Foods

* If you will be without power for a long period:
o ask friends to store your frozen foods in their freezers if they have electricity;
o see if freezer space is available in a store, church, school, or commercial freezer that has electrical service; or
o use dry ice, if available. Twenty-five pounds of dry ice will keep a ten-cubic-foot freezer below freezing for 3-4 days. Use care when handling dry ice, and wear dry, heavy gloves to avoid injury.
* Your refrigerator will keep foods cool for about four hours without power if it is unopened. Add block or dry ice to your refrigerator if the electricity will be off longer than four hours.
* Thawed food can usually be eaten if it is still "refrigerator cold," or re-frozen if it still contains ice crystals.
* To be safe, remember, "When in doubt, throw it out." Discard any food that has been at room temperature for two hours or more, and any food that has an unusual odor, color, or texture.

Sanitation and Hygiene

It is critical for you to remember to practice basic hygiene during the emergency period. Always wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected:

* before preparing or eating
* after toilet use
* after participating in cleanup activities; and
* after handling articles contaminated with floodwater or sewage.

If there is flooding along with a hurricane, the waters may contain fecal material from overflowing sewage systems and agricultural and industrial waste. Although skin contact with floodwater does not, by itself, pose a serious health risk, there is risk of disease from eating or drinking anything contaminated with floodwater.

If you have any open cuts or sores that will be exposed to floodwater, keep them as clean as possible by washing them with soap and applying an antibiotic ointment to discourage infection. If a wound develops redness, swelling, or drainage, seek immediate medical attention.

Do not allow children to play in floodwater areas. Wash children's hands frequently (always before meals), and do not allow children to play with floodwater-contaminated toys that have not been disinfected. You can disinfect toys using a solution of one cup of bleach in five gallons of water.

Immunizations

Outbreaks of communicable diseases after hurricanes are unusual. However, the rates of diseases that were present before a hurricane may increase because of a lack of sanitation or overcrowding in shelters. Increases in infectious diseases that were not present before the hurricane are not a problem, so mass vaccination programs are unnecessary.

If you have wounds, you should be evaluated for a tetanus immunization, just as you would at any other time of injury. If you receive a puncture wound or a wound contaminated with feces, soil, or saliva, have a doctor or health department determine whether a tetanus booster is necessary based on individual records.

Specific recommendations for vaccinations should be made on a case-by-case basis, or as determined by local and state health departments.

Mosquitoes

Rain and flooding in a hurricane area may lead to an increase in mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are most active at sunrise and sunset. In most cases, the mosquitoes will be pests but will not carry communicable diseases. It is unlikely that diseases which were not present in the area prior to the hurricane would be of concern. Local, state, and federal public health authorities will be actively working to control the spread of any mosquito-borne diseases.

To protect yourself from mosquitoes, use screens on dwellings, and wear clothes with long sleeves and long pants. Insect repellents that contain DEET are very effective. Be sure to read all instructions before using DEET. Care must be taken when using DEET on small children. Products containing DEET are available from stores and through local and state health departments.

To control mosquito populations, drain all standing water left in open containers outside your home.

Mental Health

The days and weeks after a hurricane are going to be rough. In addition to your physical health, you need to take some time to consider your mental health as well. Remember that some sleeplessness, anxiety, anger, hyperactivity, mild depression, or lethargy are normal, and may go away with time. If you feel any of these symptoms acutely, seek counseling. Remember that children need extra care and attention before, during, and after the storm. Be sure to locate a favorite toy or game for your child before the storm arrives to help maintain his/her sense of security. Your state and local health departments will help you find the local resources, including hospitals or health care providers, that you may need.

Seeking Assistance after a Hurricane

SEEKING DISASTER ASSISTANCE: Throughout the recovery period, it is important to monitor local radio or television reports and other media sources for information about where to get emergency housing, food, first aid, clothing, and financial assistance. The following section provides general information about the kinds of assistance that may be available.

DIRECT ASSISTANCE: Direct assistance to individuals and families may come from any number of organizations, including: the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army, and other volunteer organizations. These organizations provide food, shelter, supplies and assist in clean-up efforts.

THE FEDERAL ROLE: In the most severe disasters, the federal government is also called in to help individuals and families with temporary housing, counseling (for post-disaster trauma), low-interest loans and grants, and other assistance. The federal government also has programs that help small businesses and farmers.

Most federal assistance becomes available when the President of the United States declares a �Major Disaster� for the affected area at the request of a state governor. FEMA will provide information through the media and community outreach about federal assistance and how to apply.

Coping after a Hurricane Everyone who sees or experiences a hurricane is affected by it in some way. It is normal to feel anxious about your own safety and that of your family and close friends. Profound sadness, grief, and anger are normal reactions to an abnormal event. Acknowledging your feelings helps you recover. Focusing on your strengths and abilities helps you heal. Accepting help from community programs and resources is healthy. Everyone has different needs and different ways of coping. It is common to want to strike back at people who have caused great pain. Children and older adults are of special concern in the aftermath of disasters. Even individuals who experience a disaster �second hand� through exposure to extensive media coverage can be affected.

Contact local faith-based organizations, voluntary agencies, or professional counselors for counseling. Additionally, FEMA and state and local governments of the affected area may provide crisis counseling assistance.

Minimize this emotional and traumatic experience by being prepared, not scared and therefore you and your family will stay in control and survive a major hurricane.

SIGNS OF HURRICANE RELATED STRESS:

* Difficulty communicating thoughts.
* Difficulty sleeping.
* Difficulty maintaining balance in their lives.
* Low threshold of frustration.
* Increased use of drugs/alcohol.
* Limited attention span.
* Poor work performance.
* Headaches/stomach problems.
* Tunnel vision/muffled hearing.
* Colds or flu-like symptoms.
* Disorientation or confusion.
* Difficulty concentrating.
* Reluctance to leave home.
* Depression, sadness.
* Feelings of hopelessness.
* Mood-swings and easy bouts of crying.
* Overwhelming guilt and self-doubt.
* Fear of crowds, strangers, or being alone.

EASING HURRICANE RELATED STRESS:

* Talk with someone about your feelings - anger, sorrow, and other emotions - even though it may be difficult.
* Seek help from professional counselors who deal with post-disaster stress.
* Do not hold yourself responsible for the disastrous event or be frustrated because you feel you cannot help directly in the rescue work.
* Take steps to promote your own physical and emotional healing by healthy eating, rest, exercise, relaxation, and meditation.
* Maintain a normal family and daily routine, limiting demanding responsibilities on yourself and your family.
* Spend time with family and friends.
* Participate in memorials.
* Use existing support groups of family, friends, and religious institutions.
* Ensure you are ready for future events by restocking your disaster supplies kits and updating your family disaster plans





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The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

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107. tkeith
9:38 PM GMT on August 18, 2008
hey pat, been outa pocket in ark. a few days. unusally cool and wet for the middle of august in S.E.ark delta. i hope you got your mojo workin on that direct order to Fay... glad to be back in the big easy.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
106. nlimbo
5:18 PM GMT on August 17, 2008
hello pat

Just stoppin in to say hi to ya roger
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105. Patrap
4:46 AM GMT on August 17, 2008
Fay has a direct Order to Stay out the GOM !!!

.
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104. EmmyRose
4:44 AM GMT on August 17, 2008
BULLETIN
TROPICAL STORM FAY ADVISORY NUMBER 6
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL062008
1100 PM EDT SAT AUG 16 2008

...FAY EXPECTED TO STRENGTHEN ON SUNDAY...

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT FOR CUBA FROM THE
PROVINCE OF SANCTI SPIRITUS EASTWARD TO GUANTANAMO...AND ALSO FOR
CAYMAN BRAC AND LITTLE CAYMAN.

A HURRICANE WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT FOR CUBA FROM THE PROVINCE OF
MATANZAS EASTWARD TO SANCTI SPIRITUS.

A TROPICAL STORM WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT FOR THE CENTRAL BAHAMAS...
JAMAICA...AND THE CAYMAN ISLANDS.

AT 11 PM EDT...0300 UTC...THE TROPICAL STORM WARNING FOR HAITI HAS
BEEN DISCONTINUED.

INTERESTS IN WESTERN CUBA...THE FLORIDA KEYS...AND THE FLORIDA
PENINSULA SHOULD MONITOR THE PROGRESS OF THIS SYSTEM.

FOR STORM INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA...INCLUDING POSSIBLE
INLAND WATCHES AND WARNINGS...PLEASE MONITOR PRODUCTS ISSUED
BY YOUR LOCAL WEATHER OFFICE.

AT 1100 PM EDT...0300 UTC...THE CENTER OF TROPICAL STORM FAY WAS
LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 19.4 NORTH...LONGITUDE 76.3 WEST OR ABOUT 175
MILES...280 KM...SOUTHEAST OF CAMAGUEY CUBA AND ABOUT 100 MILES...
165 KM...NORTH-NORTHEAST OF KINGSTON JAMAICA.

FAY IS MOVING TOWARD THE WEST NEAR 14 MPH...22 KM/HR. A GRADUAL TURN
TOWARD THE WEST-NORTHWEST AND NORTHWEST WITH A DECREASE IN FORWARD
SPEED IS EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS. ON THIS
TRACK...THE CENTER OF FAY WILL CONTINUE TO MOVE NEAR OR OVER THE
SOUTHERN COAST OF EASTERN AND CENTRAL CUBA SUNDAY...AND WILL BE
NEAR OR OVER WESTERN CUBA SUNDAY NIGHT OR MONDAY.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE NEAR 45 MPH...75 KM/HR...WITH HIGHER
GUSTS. SOME STRENGTHENING IS FORECAST DURING THE NEXT 24 HOURS AND
FAY COULD BE APPROACHING HURRICANE STRENGTH AS IT NEARS WESTERN
CUBA.

TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 105 MILES...165 KM
FROM THE CENTER. GUANTANAMO CUBA RECENTLY REPORTED SUSTAINED WINDS
OF 44 MPH...71 KM/HR WITH GUSTS TO 52 MPH...83 KM/HR. RAINBANDS
ASSOCIATED WITH FAY ARE AFFECTING THE BAHAMAS AND ARE APPROACHING
THE FLORIDA STRAITS.

ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 1005 MB...29.68 INCHES.

TIDES OF 1 TO 3 FEET FEET ABOVE NORMAL CAN BE EXPECTED IN THE
WARNING AREA IN AREAS OF ONSHORE FLOW.

FAY IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE TOTAL RAINFALL ACCUMULATIONS OF 4 TO 8
INCHES OVER HAITI...EASTERN AND CENTRAL CUBA...JAMAICA...AND
THE NORTHERN CAYMAN ISLANDS...WITH ISOLATED MAXIMUM AMOUNTS OF 15
INCHES. THESE RAINS COULD PRODUCE LIFE-THREATENING FLASH FLOODS
AND MUD SLIDES. RAINFALL ACCUMULATIONS OF 1 TO 3 INCHES ARE
POSSIBLE OVER GRAND CAYMAN AND OVER THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHEASTERN
BAHAMAS.

REPEATING THE 1100 PM EDT POSITION...19.4 N...76.3 W. MOVEMENT
TOWARD...WEST NEAR 14 MPH. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...45 MPH.
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...1005 MB.

AN INTERMEDIATE ADVISORY WILL BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL HURRICANE
CENTER AT 200 AM EDT FOLLOWED BY THE NEXT COMPLETE ADVISORY AT 500
AM EDT.
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103. EmmyRose
4:29 AM GMT on August 17, 2008


YAY JR!
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102. shoreacres
3:58 AM GMT on August 17, 2008
Pat ~

Wonderful, for your son. I'll bet he's excited.
Extra special good that Fay's going to be hanging to the east and not crash the party!
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101. Patrap
3:35 AM GMT on August 17, 2008
Thnax for that Link to the conf shore..
Lotsa events coming up between now and Aug 29th.


Son has One Hour Gig Tuesday Night here Link ..His first.
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100. shoreacres
3:33 AM GMT on August 17, 2008
tkeith ~

Here's a link to this year's Rising Tide conference.
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99. EmmyRose
4:13 PM GMT on August 16, 2008
HI Pat and T

heavy rains and thunder here
nice for a change.

happy saturday
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98. mobilebayal
4:05 PM GMT on August 16, 2008
Thanks for all your links Pat! ( and humor) You really brighten up the blogs!
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97. Patrap
2:32 PM GMT on August 16, 2008
Western Atlantic - Visible Loop Link
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96. tkeith
11:35 PM GMT on August 14, 2008
evenin Pat, ya got somebody needin a job, i'm sure i could help out. my phase of the bridge is the super-structure, no concrete. but we are part of the joint venture on the approaches. i know alot of people there always lookin for good help and pay aint bad either. i saw apost here today from SOPHMOM said something about a Katrina anniversary with John Barry, author of rising tide as keynote speaker. know anything about it?...keith
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95. EmmyRose
10:41 PM GMT on August 14, 2008
I think ye need to visit me in houston for a bit....:-(

hiya pat and t!
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94. reeldrlaura
10:02 PM GMT on August 14, 2008
Pat, I'm not likin' what I'm seein' on today's spaghetti models.......what think ye?????
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93. Patrap
8:59 PM GMT on August 14, 2008
l
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92. Patrap
9:48 PM GMT on August 13, 2008
Nuthin out there to fret over..cept maybe the Bloggers,LOL
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91. EmmyRose
9:45 PM GMT on August 13, 2008
i havent seen anything batman
except for the jokers in docs blog

i swear.


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90. Patrap
9:18 PM GMT on August 13, 2008
Im sure you've seen the WNW Motion,..But,

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89. Patrap
7:31 PM GMT on August 12, 2008
That Sw fetch has been a blowing all day here.

You can tell somethings on the Move.

NOLA radar Link
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88. Patrap
7:30 PM GMT on August 12, 2008
Tornado Watch

Statement as of 2:21 PM CDT on August 12, 2008


The National Weather Service has issued Tornado Watch 823 in
effect until 10 PM CDT this evening for the following areas

In Louisiana this watch includes 22 parishes

In southeast Louisiana

Ascension Assumption East Baton Rouge
East Feliciana Iberville Jefferson
Lafourche Livingston Orleans
Plaquemines Pointe Coupee St. Bernard
St. Charles St. Helena St. James
St. John The Baptist St. Tammany Tangipahoa
Terrebonne Washington West Baton Rouge
West Feliciana

In Mississippi this watch includes 8 counties

In southern Mississippi

Amite Hancock Harrison
Jackson Pearl River Pike
Walthall Wilkinson

This includes the cities of... Addis... Baton Rouge...
Bay St. Louis... Bayou Cane... Belle Chasse... Biloxi... Bogalusa...
Brusly... Centreville... Chalmette... Clinton... Covington... Crosby...
cut off... Denham Springs... Destrehan... Diamondhead...
Donaldsonville... Franklinton... Galliano... Gautier... Gloster...
Gonzales... Gramercy... Greensburg... Gulfport... Hammond... Houma...
Jackson... Kenner... Labadieville... Lacombe... LaPlace... LaRose...
Liberty... Livonia... Lutcher... Mandeville... McComb... Metairie...
Montpelier... Moss Point... New Orleans... New Roads... Norco...
Ocean Springs... Paincourtville... Pascagoula... Picayune...
Pierre Part... Plaquemine... Ponchatoula... Port Allen...
Port Sulphur... Raceland... Reserve... Slidell... St. Francisville...
St. Martin... Thibodaux... Tylertown... Violet... Walker... Waveland...
White Castle and Woodville.
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87. EmmyRose
7:28 PM GMT on August 12, 2008
Bush Administration More Than Quadruples 2009 Hurricane Forecast Improvement Budget Request to $17 Million
August 11, 2008




Hurricane Dolly on July 23, 2008.

High resolution (Credit: NOAA)
The Bush Administration is bolstering funding for hurricane research and forecast improvements by $13 million to accelerate NOAA scientists’ ability to more accurately forecast tropical storms, hurricane intensity, the paths of these dangerous storms, and related storm surges.

The $13 million increase to NOAA’s Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project is added to the original $4 million request for a total of $17 million for fiscal year 2009.

“This increased budget reflects President Bush’s commitment to advancing science and technical capabilities of the United States government to protect life and property of the nation’s citizens,” said retired Navy Vice Admiral Conrad C. Lautenbacher, Jr., Ph.D., under secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator. “NOAA has developed an aggressive plan to accelerate improvements to our hurricane forecasting capabilities.”

Goals of the Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project include improving the accuracy and reliability of predicting rapidly intensifying storms and extending the lead time of hurricane prediction with increased certainty. NOAA will use the funding in four major areas to: increase hurricane observations; advance forecast models through research, development and engineering; increase computing power; and enhance collaboration with hurricane scientists in the private sector, government, and universities to advance research and operations.

Specific advancements outlined in the plan include:

Improving hurricane track forecast accuracy by 20 percent for Days 1 through 5 by 2013;
Improving hurricane intensity forecast accuracy by 20 percent for Days 1 through 5 by 2013; and
Extending the lead time for hurricane forecasts out to Day 7.
Planning for the Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project began after the 2005 hurricane season — the most active on record — which produced several monster storms, including Hurricane Katrina. Reports provided to NOAA from the National Science Foundation and the NOAA Science Advisory Board, with input from university partners, other government agencies, and the private sector, were used to develop and adopt the final project framework on July 18, 2008.

NOAA Hurricane scientists announced Thursday an increase in probability to 85 percent that this year’s Atlantic hurricane season will be above normal with 14-18 named storms, including seven to ten hurricanes. So far the region has seen five named storms, leaving a long way to go to the end of the season in November.

NOAA understands and predicts changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and conserves and manages our coastal and marine resources
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86. EmmyRose
6:54 PM GMT on August 12, 2008
I'm sure you already know....


BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED TORNADO WARNING NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NEW ORLEANS LA 104 PM CDT TUE AUG 12 2008 THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN NEW ORLEANS HAS ISSUED A * TORNADO WARNING FOR... EAST FELICIANA PARISH IN SOUTHEAST LOUISIANA... THIS INCLUDES THE CITIES OF...JACKSON...CLINTON... SOUTHEASTERN WEST FELICIANA PARISH IN SOUTHEAST LOUISIANA... * UNTIL 130 PM CDT * AT 102 PM CDT...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM CAPABLE OF PRODUCING A TORNADO NEAR JACKSON... MOVING NORTHEAST AT 41 MPH. * THE TORNADO WILL BE NEAR... CLINTON BY 120 PM CDT... IN ADDITION TO THE TORNADO...THIS STORM IS CAPABLE OF PRODUCING DESTRUCTIVE STRAIGHT LINE WINDS. THE SAFEST PLACE TO BE DURING A TORNADO IS UNDER A WORKBENCH OR OTHER PIECE OF STURDY FURNITURE. SEEK SHELTER ON THE LOWEST FLOOR OF THE BUILDING IN AN INTERIOR HALLWAY OR ROOM SUCH AS A CLOSET. USE BLANKETS OR PILLOWS TO COVER YOUR BODY AND ALWAYS STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS. IF IN MOBILE HOMES OR VEHICLES...EVACUATE THEM AND GET INSIDE A SUBSTANTIAL SHELTER. IF NO SHELTER IS AVAILABLE...LIE FLAT IN THE NEAREST DITCH OR OTHER LOW SPOT AND COVER YOUR HEAD WITH YOUR HANDS. LAT...LON 3081 9084 3071 9115 3071 9125 3069 9126 3069 9127 3083 9136 3100 9098 3100 9096 TIME...MOT...LOC 1804Z 243DEG 36KT 3080 9121
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85. charlestonlady
2:58 PM GMT on August 12, 2008
just stopping in to say good morning pat!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
84. Patrap
2:48 PM GMT on August 12, 2008
Air Force Hurricane Hunters fly into the eye of Hurricane Felix. Video starts about 20 miles outside of the eye. Red light is gear handle, which comes on when throttles are in idle. For more pictures and info see HurricaneHunters.com

video YouTube Link
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83. EmmyRose
9:05 PM GMT on August 11, 2008
sigh - its monday
i'm swamped
its hot
already sad august is slipping away
STOP I SAY - go slower...........

just checkin in -

working tonight but didnt want the
day to slip away without a hey.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
82. NRAamy
3:45 PM GMT on August 11, 2008



for Nova....

:)
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81. Patrap
3:09 PM GMT on August 11, 2008
I wanna Thank You...


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80. GulfCoastQueen
10:08 PM GMT on August 10, 2008
Nothing... just wanted to put this back at the top. Info is great and I want it to be read over and over and over.....
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79. Patrap
3:04 PM GMT on August 10, 2008
Morning Emms..rise and shine here. Opened my Puter and there I was..at the top of the directory.LOL

Good Morning ally...welcome.

O Yeah tkeith ,the City does have that ol curse of once you've lived here long enuf,..you'll always return.
Kinda like an ol Lafitte Pyrate thing with a lil Marie Laveux Voodoo tossed in,
Yous a citizen now Im afraid.

Any Hiring on da Bridge Job for a Mason/Laborer?
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78. EmmyRose
2:59 PM GMT on August 10, 2008
Good Morning Dear Pat and T
Hope all is well in your world
this sunny bright Sunday!
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77. AllyBama
2:58 PM GMT on August 10, 2008
Happy Sunday my friend..

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76. tkeith
2:34 AM GMT on August 10, 2008
hey pat, just wanted to tell ya the skynard concert was fantastic. never thought i would enjoy kid rock as much as i did. im new to this great city as resident, been a tourista for many years. now that im experiencing living here, even with some of the negatives we all know about. i dont think you'll be able to run me off with a dirty mop...lol keith
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75. Patrap
2:05 AM GMT on August 10, 2008
Quoting sandcrab39565:
A note of thanks to all that have supported me as the director of EMA in my county but it is now official I will be stepping down at the end of this season. The stress and other reasons I must move on. I will take a short break and will be behind the scenes to support the preparedness and safety in my area I however will step away from the leadership role. This is my decision and not a political one. This will allow me to be more involved with our recovery without the worry of preparedness. I again will be here and thank all my WU freinds.
Pat, i am tired my friend and hope I have not failed you. .



sandcrab..in no way could you fail anyone with your distinguished and Lengthy career.

As one who has given decades of service to your Nation,State,..and community,..we owe you a debt of gratitude.

Miss will lose a great and courageous Leader,who in the worst of times,..gave 110% under the most dire of Circumstance.
Those days,..known by few and many..will always be a shared thing among us.
Your friendship to me ,my family was and is a treasured one.
You came to me here..and we saw a common bond in Emg Prep,..and even strolled the French Quarter during the Hurricane Conference here in April 07.

If your desire is to move on,.. I fully understand and support it.
Looking forward to fishing and BS'ing life in General with yas..
Many things to ponder as we pull in da Big uns.
Your friend.

Patrick
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74. seflagamma
2:20 PM GMT on August 09, 2008
Good morning Pat,

It's Saturday, Happy Weekend to you!!!
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73. reeldrlaura
2:01 PM GMT on August 09, 2008
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72. sandcrab39565
3:23 AM GMT on August 09, 2008
A note of thanks to all that have supported me as the director of EMA in my county but it is now official I will be stepping down at the end of this season. The stress and other reasons I must move on. I will take a short break and will be behind the scenes to support the preparedness and safety in my area I however will step away from the leadership role. This is my decision and not a political one. This will allow me to be more involved with our recovery without the worry of preparedness. I again will be here and thank all my WU freinds.
Pat, i am tired my friend and hope I have not failed you. .
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71. Patrap
10:01 PM GMT on August 08, 2008
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70. EmmyRose
9:55 PM GMT on August 08, 2008
thanks pat
i believe in miracles.
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69. Patrap
9:54 PM GMT on August 08, 2008
The Romantics - Talking In Your Sleep (1983, COMPLETE WITHOUT PUBLICITY)

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68. Patrap
9:51 PM GMT on August 08, 2008
Uh-Oh !!!

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67. Patrap
8:03 PM GMT on August 08, 2008
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66. Patrap
7:58 PM GMT on August 08, 2008
Copy that Houston..

Prayer in works..


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65. EmmyRose
7:55 PM GMT on August 08, 2008
put up a little prayer this weekend.
:-)
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63. Patrap
4:57 PM GMT on August 08, 2008
Coming in February 2009:

Dan Baum's New Book will be out in Feb.

Nine Lives: Death and Life in New Orleans

Our book, intertwining the life stories of nine extraordinary New Orleanians before, during, and after Hurricane Katrina, will be published by Spiegel & Grau.

For Dan's "New Orleans Journal," on the New Yorker magazine's website, click here! Link

Dan and Margaret are now working on a book about New Orleans that will intertwine the life stories of eight New Orleanians to tell the modern history of the city, up through Hurricane Katrina. It will be published by Spiegel & Grau, a new imprint of Random House, around Mardi Gras 2009. Dan and Margaret spent four months in New Orleans in the spring of 2007 researching the book. During that time, Dan wrote a daily online column about life in post-Katrina New Orleans for the New Yorker magazine's website. (see link above). In August 2004, Dan and Margaret began working exclusively for the New Yorker, with Dan's byline appearing as "staff writer." Margaret and Dan's work usually appears under Dan's byline. Non-fiction frequently calls for a strong individual voice, and occasionally the use of the first person, so double bylines often aren't practical. Dan most often does the legwork of reporting the story -- the travel and the phone calls -- though well directed by Margaret. Dan then writes the first draft, at which point Margaret takes over, and the piece goes back and forth many times before completion. Simply put, when there's a piece to write, Dan ropes it and Margaret skins it.
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61. cyclonebuster
5:52 AM GMT on August 07, 2008
a href="" target="_blank">Link
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60. cyclonebuster
5:49 AM GMT on August 07, 2008
Dang it Patrap I didn't want to launch the nukes! Just a few of the MOABS!!

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59. EmmyRose
5:33 AM GMT on August 07, 2008
PAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Look at this new blog!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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58. Patrap
3:38 AM GMT on August 07, 2008
Looks Like the Device was on time and Target GSM..were awaiting GOES-12 Imagery on the results..
Stand By.

See if Nash can get a Binocular cam out window 3..for a view too.

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57. Patrap
3:32 AM GMT on August 07, 2008
CB..How Many Mentos did you Put in that Coke..for the core?



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