Hurricane Preparation 2010

By: Patrap , 1:34 AM GMT on April 05, 2010






It's time to dust off that family disaster plan, or in many cases, create one.

Keeping your family safe during a hurricane starts with proper planning. One in six Americans live along the eastern seaboard or the Gulf of Mexico, making hurricane preparation a must for many and their families.









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History teaches that a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. By knowing your vulnerability and what actions you should take, you can reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster.

5
HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS TIPS



Hurricane hazards come in many forms: storm surge, high winds, tornadoes, and flooding. This means it is important for your family to have a plan that includes all of these hazards. Look carefully at the safety actions associated with each type of hurricane hazard and prepare your family disaster plan accordingly. But remember this is only a guide. The first and most important thing anyone should do when facing a hurricane threat is to use common sense.

You should be able to answer the following questions before a hurricane threatens:

*
What are the Hurricane Hazards?
*
What does it mean to you?
*
What actions should you take to be prepared?

Hurricanes and Your Health and Safety


* The great majority of injuries during a hurricane are cuts caused by flying glass or other debris. Other injuries include puncture wounds resulting from exposed nails, metal, or glass, and bone fractures.
* State and local health departments may issue health advisories or recommendations particular to local conditions. If in doubt, contact your local or state health department.
* Make sure to include all essential medications -- both prescription and over the counter -- in your family's emergency disaster kit.


* Hurricanes, especially if accompanied by a tidal surge or flooding, can contaminate the public water supply. Drinking contaminated water may cause illness. You cannot assume that the water in the hurricane-affected area is safe to drink.
* In the area hit by a hurricane, water treatment plants may not be operating; even if they are, storm damage and flooding can contaminate water lines. Listen for public announcements about the safety of the municipal water supply.
* If your well has been flooded, it needs to be tested and disinfected after the storm passes and the floodwaters recede. Questions about testing should be directed to your local or state health department.

Water Safety

* Use bottled water that has not been exposed to flood waters if it is available.
* If you don't have bottled water, you should boil water to make it safe. Boiling water will kill most types of disease-causing organisms that may be present. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for boiling. Boil the water for one minute, let it cool, and store it in clean containers with covers.
* If you can't boil water, you can disinfect it using household bleach. Bleach will kill some, but not all, types of disease-causing organisms that may be in the water. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for disinfection. Add 1/8 teaspoon (or 8 drops) of regular, unscented, liquid household bleach for each gallon of water, stir it well and let it stand for 30 minutes before you use it. Store disinfected water in clean containers with covers.
* If you have a well that has been flooded, the water should be tested and disinfected after flood waters recede. If you suspect that your well may be contaminated, contact your local or state health department or agriculture extension agent for specific advice.

Food Safety

* Do not eat any food that may have come into contact with flood water.
* Discard any food that is not in a waterproof container if there is any chance that it has come into contact with flood water. Food containers that are not waterproof include those with screw-caps, snap lids, pull tops, and crimped caps. Also, discard cardboard juice/milk/baby formula boxes and home canned foods if they have come in contact with flood water, because they cannot be effectively cleaned and sanitized.
* Inspect canned foods and discard any food in damaged cans. Can damage is shown by swelling; leakage; punctures; holes; fractures; extensive deep rusting; or crushing/denting severe enough to prevent normal stacking or opening with a manual, wheel-type can opener.
* Undamaged, commercially prepared foods in all-metal cans and retort pouches (for example, flexible, shelf-stable juice or seafood pouches) can be saved if you do the following:
o Remove the labels, if they are the removable kind, since they can harbor dirt and bacteria.
o Thoroughly wash the cans or retort pouches with soap and water, using hot water if it is available.
o Brush or wipe away any dirt or silt.
o Rinse the cans or retort pouches with water that is safe for drinking, if available, since dirt or residual soap will reduce the effectiveness of chlorine sanitation.
o Then, sanitize them by immersion in one of the two following ways:
+ place in water and allow the water to come to a boil and continue boiling for 2 minutes, or
+ place in a freshly-made solution consisting of 1 tablespoon of unscented liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available) for 15 minutes.
* Air dry cans or retort pouches for a minimum of 1 hour before opening or storing.
* If the labels were removable, then re-label your cans or retort pouches, including the expiration date (if available), with a marker.
* Food in reconditioned cans or retort pouches should be used as soon as possible, thereafter.
* Any concentrated baby formula in reconditioned, all-metal containers must be diluted with clean, drinking water.
* Thoroughly wash metal pans, ceramic dishes, and utensils (including can openers) with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize them by boiling in clean water or immersing them for 15 minutes in a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available).
* Thoroughly wash countertops with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize by applying a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available). Allow to air dry.

Frozen and Refrigerated Foods

* If you will be without power for a long period:
o ask friends to store your frozen foods in their freezers if they have electricity;
o see if freezer space is available in a store, church, school, or commercial freezer that has electrical service; or
o use dry ice, if available. Twenty-five pounds of dry ice will keep a ten-cubic-foot freezer below freezing for 3-4 days. Use care when handling dry ice, and wear dry, heavy gloves to avoid injury.
* Your refrigerator will keep foods cool for about four hours without power if it is unopened. Add block or dry ice to your refrigerator if the electricity will be off longer than four hours.
* Thawed food can usually be eaten if it is still "refrigerator cold," or re-frozen if it still contains ice crystals.
* To be safe, remember, "When in doubt, throw it out." Discard any food that has been at room temperature for two hours or more, and any food that has an unusual odor, color, or texture.

Sanitation and Hygiene

It is critical for you to remember to practice basic hygiene during the emergency period. Always wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected:

* before preparing or eating
* after toilet use
* after participating in cleanup activities; and
* after handling articles contaminated with floodwater or sewage.

If there is flooding along with a hurricane, the waters may contain fecal material from overflowing sewage systems and agricultural and industrial waste. Although skin contact with floodwater does not, by itself, pose a serious health risk, there is risk of disease from eating or drinking anything contaminated with floodwater.

If you have any open cuts or sores that will be exposed to floodwater, keep them as clean as possible by washing them with soap and applying an antibiotic ointment to discourage infection. If a wound develops redness, swelling, or drainage, seek immediate medical attention.

Do not allow children to play in floodwater areas. Wash children's hands frequently (always before meals), and do not allow children to play with floodwater-contaminated toys that have not been disinfected. You can disinfect toys using a solution of one cup of bleach in five gallons of water.

Immunizations

Outbreaks of communicable diseases after hurricanes are unusual. However, the rates of diseases that were present before a hurricane may increase because of a lack of sanitation or overcrowding in shelters. Increases in infectious diseases that were not present before the hurricane are not a problem, so mass vaccination programs are unnecessary.

If you have wounds, you should be evaluated for a tetanus immunization, just as you would at any other time of injury. If you receive a puncture wound or a wound contaminated with feces, soil, or saliva, have a doctor or health department determine whether a tetanus booster is necessary based on individual records.

Specific recommendations for vaccinations should be made on a case-by-case basis, or as determined by local and state health departments.

Mosquitoes

Rain and flooding in a hurricane area may lead to an increase in mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are most active at sunrise and sunset. In most cases, the mosquitoes will be pests but will not carry communicable diseases. It is unlikely that diseases which were not present in the area prior to the hurricane would be of concern. Local, state, and federal public health authorities will be actively working to control the spread of any mosquito-borne diseases.

To protect yourself from mosquitoes, use screens on dwellings, and wear clothes with long sleeves and long pants. Insect repellents that contain DEET are very effective. Be sure to read all instructions before using DEET. Care must be taken when using DEET on small children. Products containing DEET are available from stores and through local and state health departments.

To control mosquito populations, drain all standing water left in open containers outside your home.

Mental Health

The days and weeks after a hurricane are going to be rough. In addition to your physical health, you need to take some time to consider your mental health as well. Remember that some sleeplessness, anxiety, anger, hyperactivity, mild depression, or lethargy are normal, and may go away with time. If you feel any of these symptoms acutely, seek counseling. Remember that children need extra care and attention before, during, and after the storm. Be sure to locate a favorite toy or game for your child before the storm arrives to help maintain his/her sense of security. Your state and local health departments will help you find the local resources, including hospitals or health care providers, that you may need.

Seeking Assistance after a Hurricane

SEEKING DISASTER ASSISTANCE: Throughout the recovery period, it is important to monitor local radio or television reports and other media sources for information about where to get emergency housing, food, first aid, clothing, and financial assistance. The following section provides general information about the kinds of assistance that may be available.

DIRECT ASSISTANCE: Direct assistance to individuals and families may come from any number of organizations, including: the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army, and other volunteer organizations. These organizations provide food, shelter, supplies and assist in clean-up efforts.

THE FEDERAL ROLE: In the most severe disasters, the federal government is also called in to help individuals and families with temporary housing, counseling (for post-disaster trauma), low-interest loans and grants, and other assistance. The federal government also has programs that help small businesses and farmers.

Most federal assistance becomes available when the President of the United States declares a Major Disaster for the affected area at the request of a state governor. FEMA will provide information through the media and community outreach about federal assistance and how to apply.

Coping after a Hurricane Everyone who sees or experiences a hurricane is affected by it in some way. It is normal to feel anxious about your own safety and that of your family and close friends. Profound sadness, grief, and anger are normal reactions to an abnormal event. Acknowledging your feelings helps you recover. Focusing on your strengths and abilities helps you heal. Accepting help from community programs and resources is healthy. Everyone has different needs and different ways of coping. It is common to want to strike back at people who have caused great pain. Children and older adults are of special concern in the aftermath of disasters. Even individuals who experience a disaster �second hand� through exposure to extensive media coverage can be affected.

Contact local faith-based organizations, voluntary agencies, or professional counselors for counseling. Additionally, FEMA and state and local governments of the affected area may provide crisis counseling assistance.

Minimize this emotional and traumatic experience by being prepared, not scared and therefore you and your family will stay in control and survive a major hurricane.

SIGNS OF HURRICANE RELATED STRESS:

* Difficulty communicating thoughts.
* Difficulty sleeping.
* Difficulty maintaining balance in their lives.
* Low threshold of frustration.
* Increased use of drugs/alcohol.
* Limited attention span.
* Poor work performance.
* Headaches/stomach problems.
* Tunnel vision/muffled hearing.
* Colds or flu-like symptoms.
* Disorientation or confusion.
* Difficulty concentrating.
* Reluctance to leave home.
* Depression, sadness.
* Feelings of hopelessness.
* Mood-swings and easy bouts of crying.
* Overwhelming guilt and self-doubt.
* Fear of crowds, strangers, or being alone.

EASING HURRICANE RELATED STRESS:

* Talk with someone about your feelings - anger, sorrow, and other emotions - even though it may be difficult.
* Seek help from professional counselors who deal with post-disaster stress.
* Do not hold yourself responsible for the disastrous event or be frustrated because you feel you cannot help directly in the rescue work.
* Take steps to promote your own physical and emotional healing by healthy eating, rest, exercise, relaxation, and meditation.
* Maintain a normal family and daily routine, limiting demanding responsibilities on yourself and your family.
* Spend time with family and friends.
* Participate in memorials.
* Use existing support groups of family, friends, and religious institutions.
* Ensure you are ready for future events by restocking your disaster supplies kits and updating your family disaster plans.

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The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

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Viewing: 75 - 25

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74. Patrap
4:29 AM GMT on April 12, 2010
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
73. Patrap
4:25 AM GMT on April 12, 2010
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
72. Patrap
4:07 AM GMT on April 12, 2010
Neighbor Mr Rivers the Saxaphonist has gig with Dr. John Thursday Night,and he performs Friday at Jazz Fest too,on Stage at his regla time slot,..

Gonna try and go Thursday Night with Mr. Rivers if he will have me...and the cam.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
71. Patrap
4:05 AM GMT on April 12, 2010
Lotsa creeps Coast wide..

CNN ran a good spot on Treme with some Goodman Scenes.

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
70. EmmyRose
3:24 AM GMT on April 12, 2010
Just finished watching HBO's "TREME" - 'treme ndous!!!!" one of the lines cracked me up

"Is the Treme safe now. "

"Sure all the crimes moved to Houston"

rim shot.....

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
69. Patrap
2:14 AM GMT on April 12, 2010



363
fxus64 klix 120132
afdlix


Area forecast discussion
National Weather Service New Orleans la
832 PM CDT sun Apr 11 2010


Update...


..sounding discussion...


No problems with the flight this evening. A fairly dry sounding
again this evening with some moisture still hanging around at 700
millibars...however not enough for any cloud development. Winds
continue to be light from the east and southeast in the lower
levels with light to moderate westerlies in place aloft.




&&


Previous discussion... /issued 318 PM CDT sun Apr 11 2010/


Short term...
high pressure over the eastern states will move little as upper
ridge develops over the Mississippi River valley. Moderate
easterly flow will continue through the period with no
precipitation expected. Guidance has been struggling with the dew
point forecast over the last few days...as air is drier than
models have been forecasting. This is allowing overnight lows to
fall about 5 degrees below normal...and trend likely to continue
through at least tonight. Afternoon highs running a degree or two
above normal in many places as well. Once we acquire a southerly
component to the winds...moisture will return rapidly and
overnight lows will jump into the middle and upper 50s. 35


Long term...
upper ridging continues through at least Friday. After
that...question becomes when the ridge breaks down. Current 12z
GFS solution supports previous forecast package...which was dry.
Will continue this Route with temperatures forecast to be near
seasonal norms. 35


Aviation...
VFR ceiling and visibility OK conditions to prevail at all terminals with a chance at
tempo MVFR visibility in br at kbtr and kmcb between 09z-13z. 24/rr


Marine...
easterly flow to become steady state and persistent for much of the
week with a 8-9 second ground swell developing from the Florida
Straits in time. Increasing tide levels along east facing shores
will have to be monitored for middle to latter part of week but neap
part of lunar tide cycle may offset this concern short of
nuisance. 24/rr
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
68. Patrap
1:40 AM GMT on April 12, 2010
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
67. Patrap
11:56 PM GMT on April 11, 2010
Heres that Buoy Ball that washed up against the RR tracks in Rudduck,La from Katrina in 05.

I couldnt budge it with a cypress log so itsa Heavy thing,...old too from the welds...and rust.






Video of the Buoy and Debris field
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
66. Patrap
12:42 AM GMT on April 11, 2010
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
65. Patrap
11:15 PM GMT on April 10, 2010
I feel unhappy
I feel so sad
I lost the best friend
That I ever had

She was my woman
I loved her so
But it's too late now
I've let her go

I'm going through changes
I'm going through changes

We shared the eve's
We shared each day
In love together
We found a way

But soon the world
Had its evil way
My heart was blinded
Love went astray

I'm going through changes
I'm going through changes

It took so long
To realize
That I can still hear
Her last goodbyes

Now all my days
Are filled with tears
Wish I could go back
And change these years

I'm going through changes
I'm going through changes



Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
64. Patrap
9:01 PM GMT on April 10, 2010
Just when I thought it was safe to head downtown..
Sheeeeshh!!



# Haley Barbour, David Vitter and GOP Chairman Michael Steele address Southern Republican conference today 2:34 PM
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
63. Patrap
6:36 PM GMT on April 10, 2010
A Stop-by-Stop Guidebook
for the St. Charles Ave Streetcar


Know exactly what you're in for,
before signaling for a stop!




Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
62. Patrap
6:34 PM GMT on April 10, 2010
It's official: festival season is on


By Molly Reid, The Times-Picayune
April 10, 2010, 12:17PM

If you haven't realized it yet, come to the French Quarter and you'll see: Festival season 2010 is kicking into high gear.

I heard it in the hiss of a crawfish boil starting to simmer on a Royal Street sidewalk in the Marigny triangle. I saw it in the camping chairs slung over people's shoulders, the festival hats and the packed day bags.


Walking into the French Quarter minutes after most of the stages had started their first shows, I saw the kind of crowds you'd expect to see halfway through the day. At the Old U.S. Mint, lawn chairs and dancers filled the Crystal Hot Sauce Cajun Zydeco Showcase stage almost completely, as J.J. Caillier and the Zydeco Knockouts put some spice in the morning.

Down at the riverfront, at the Abita Beer Stage, Leo Jackson and the Melody Clouds wailed and praised Jesus like it was Sunday morning, sounding like a cross between George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic and a raucous gospel band. Nearby, at the Capital One Bank Riverside Legacy Stage, the Orleans Brass Band got people dancing as they munched on po-boys and snowballs.

Some tips, in case you don't already know: Coolers are not allowed in the Woldenberg Park area, and security personnel are monitoring all the entrances. They're also on the lookout for bikes, which also are prohibited in the park. There is ample bike parking on the Quarter side of the railroad tracks.

It's a crowded but lovely day in the French Quarter, so if you're headed this way, get your festival game face on and get ready to play.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
61. Patrap
6:17 PM GMT on April 10, 2010


ssnubb123 Actually this guy talks a a whole lot of sense, hi or not. What he's saying is that our western life style is not and never hasbeen sustainable. Were using our natural resources and fossil fuels at a rate that they cannot replenish themselves. When there gone we will be forced back to times without all of these luxuries that we know today. Maybe not 2012 but its coming soon enough
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
60. Patrap
4:28 PM GMT on April 10, 2010
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
59. Patrap
4:53 AM GMT on April 10, 2010
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
58. Patrap
4:26 AM GMT on April 10, 2010
New Orleans: A Geopolitical Prize

By George Friedman
http://www.stratfor.com/news/archive...cs_katrina.php

September 01, 2005 22 30 GMT --

The American political system was
founded in Philadelphia, but the American nation was built on the
vast farmlands that stretch from the Alleghenies to the Rockies.
That farmland produced the wealth that funded American
industrialization: It permitted the formation of a class of small
landholders who, amazingly, could produce more than they could
consume. They could sell their excess crops in the east and in
Europe and save that money, which eventually became the founding
capital of American industry.

But it was not the extraordinary land nor the farmers and ranchers
who alone set the process in motion. Rather, it was geography -- the
extraordinary system of rivers that flowed through the Midwest and
allowed them to ship their surplus to the rest of the world. All of
the rivers flowed into one -- the Mississippi -- and the Mississippi
flowed to the ports in and around one city: New Orleans. It was in
New Orleans that the barges from upstream were unloaded and their
cargos stored, sold and reloaded on ocean-going vessels. Until last
Sunday, New Orleans was, in many ways, the pivot of the American
economy.

For that reason, the Battle of New Orleans in January 1815 was a key
moment in American history. Even though the battle occurred after
the War of 1812 was over, had the British taken New Orleans, we
suspect they wouldn't have given it back. Without New Orleans, the
entire Louisiana Purchase would have been valueless to the United
States. Or, to state it more precisely, the British would control
the region because, at the end of the day, the value of the Purchase
was the land and the rivers - which all converged on the Mississippi
and the ultimate port of New Orleans. The hero of the battle was
Andrew Jackson, and when he became president, his obsession with
Texas had much to do with keeping the Mexicans away from New
Orleans.

During the Cold War, a macabre topic of discussion among bored
graduate students who studied such things was this: If the Soviets
could destroy one city with a large nuclear device, which would it
be? The usual answers were Washington or New York. For me, the
answer was simple: New Orleans. If the Mississippi River was shut to
traffic, then the foundations of the economy would be shattered. The
industrial minerals needed in the factories wouldn't come in, and
the agricultural wealth wouldn't flow out. Alternative routes really
weren't available. The Germans knew it too: A U-boat campaign
occurred near the mouth of the Mississippi during World War II. Both
the Germans and Stratfor have stood with Andy Jackson: New Orleans
was the prize.

Last Sunday, nature took out New Orleans almost as surely as a
nuclear strike. Hurricane Katrina's geopolitical effect was not, in
many ways, distinguishable from a mushroom cloud. The key exit from
North America was closed. The petrochemical industry, which has
become an added value to the region since Jackson's days, was at
risk. The navigability of the Mississippi south of New Orleans was a
question mark. New Orleans as a city and as a port complex had
ceased to exist, and it was not clear that it could recover.

The ports of South Louisiana and New Orleans, which run north and
south of the city, are as important today as at any point during the
history of the republic. On its own merit, the Port of South
Louisiana is the largest port in the United States by tonnage and
the fifth-largest in the world. It exports more than 52 million tons
a year, of which more than half are agricultural products -- corn,
soybeans and so on. A larger proportion of U.S. agriculture flows
out of the port. Almost as much cargo, nearly 57 million tons, comes
in through the port -- including not only crude oil, but chemicals
and fertilizers, coal, concrete and so on.

A simple way to think about the New Orleans port complex is that it
is where the bulk commodities of agriculture go out to the world and
the bulk commodities of industrialism come in. The commodity chain
of the global food industry starts here, as does that of American
industrialism. If these facilities are gone, more than the price of
goods shifts: The very physical structure of the global economy
would have to be reshaped. Consider the impact to the U.S. auto
industry if steel doesn't come up the river, or the effect on global
food supplies if U.S. corn and soybeans don't get to the markets.

The problem is that there are no good shipping alternatives. River
transport is cheap, and most of the commodities we are discussing
have low value-to-weight ratios. The U.S. transport system was built
on the assumption that these commodities would travel to and from
New Orleans by barge, where they would be loaded on ships or
offloaded. Apart from port capacity elsewhere in the United States,
there aren't enough trucks or rail cars to handle the long-distance
hauling of these enormous quantities -- assuming for the moment that
the economics could be managed, which they can't be.

The focus in the media has been on the oil industry in Louisiana and
Mississippi. This is not a trivial question, but in a certain sense,
it is dwarfed by the shipping issue. First, Louisiana is the source
of about 15 percent of U.S.-produced petroleum, much of it from the
Gulf. The local refineries are critical to American infrastructure.
Were all of these facilities to be lost, the effect on the price of
oil worldwide would be extraordinarily painful. If the river itself
became unnavigable or if the ports are no longer functioning,
however, the impact to the wider economy would be significantly more
severe. In a sense, there is more flexibility in oil than in the
physical transport of these other commodities.

There is clearly good news as information comes in. By all accounts,
the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port, which services supertankers in the
Gulf, is intact. Port Fourchon, which is the center of extraction
operations in the Gulf, has sustained damage but is recoverable. The
status of the oil platforms is unclear and it is not known what the
underwater systems look like, but on the surface, the damage -
though not trivial -- is manageable.

The news on the river is also far better than would have been
expected on Sunday. The river has not changed its course. No major
levees containing the river have burst. The Mississippi apparently
has not silted up to such an extent that massive dredging would be
required to render it navigable. Even the port facilities, although
apparently damaged in many places and destroyed in few, are still
there. The river, as transport corridor, has not been lost.

What has been lost is the city of New Orleans and many of the
residential suburban areas around it. The population has fled,
leaving behind a relatively small number of people in desperate
straits. Some are dead, others are dying, and the magnitude of the
situation dwarfs the resources required to ameliorate their
condition. But it is not the population that is trapped in New
Orleans that is of geopolitical significance: It is the population
that has left and has nowhere to return to.

The oil fields, pipelines and ports required a skilled workforce in
order to operate. That workforce requires homes. They require stores
to buy food and other supplies. Hospitals and doctors. Schools for
their children. In other words, in order to operate the facilities
critical to the United States, you need a workforce to do it -- and
that workforce is gone. Unlike in other disasters, that workforce
cannot return to the region because they have no place to live. New
Orleans is gone, and the metropolitan area surrounding New Orleans
is either gone or so badly damaged that it will not be inhabitable
for a long time.

It is possible to jury-rig around this problem for a short time. But
the fact is that those who have left the area have gone to live with
relatives and friends. Those who had the ability to leave also had
networks of relationships and resources to manage their exile. But
those resources are not infinite -- and as it becomes apparent that
these people will not be returning to New Orleans any time soon,
they will be enrolling their children in new schools, finding new
jobs, finding new accommodations. If they have any insurance money
coming, they will collect it. If they have none, then -- whatever
emotional connections they may have to their home -- their economic
connection to it has been severed. In a very short time, these
people will be making decisions that will start to reshape
population and workforce patterns in the region.

A city is a complex and ongoing process - one that requires physical
infrastructure to support the people who live in it and people to
operate that physical infrastructure. We don't simply mean power
plants or sewage treatment facilities, although they are critical.
Someone has to be able to sell a bottle of milk or a new shirt.
Someone has to be able to repair a car or do surgery. And the people
who do those things, along with the infrastructure that supports
them, are gone -- and they are not coming back anytime soon.

It is in this sense, then, that it seems almost as if a nuclear
weapon went off in New Orleans. The people mostly have fled rather
than died, but they are gone. Not all of the facilities are
destroyed, but most are. It appears to us that New Orleans and its
environs have passed the point of recoverability. The area can
recover, to be sure, but only with the commitment of massive
resources from outside -- and those resources would always be at
risk to another Katrina.

The displacement of population is the crisis that New Orleans faces.
It is also a national crisis, because the largest port in the United
States cannot function without a city around it. The physical and
business processes of a port cannot occur in a ghost town, and right
now, that is what New Orleans is. It is not about the facilities,
and it is not about the oil. It is about the loss of a city's
population and the paralysis of the largest port in the United
States.

Let's go back to the beginning. The United States historically has
depended on the Mississippi and its tributaries for transport.
Barges navigate the river. Ships go on the ocean. The barges must
offload to the ships and vice versa. There must be a facility to
empower this exchange. It is also the facility where goods are
stored in transit. Without this port, the river can't be used.
Protecting that port has been, from the time of the Louisiana
Purchase, a fundamental national security issue for the United
States.

Katrina has taken out the port -- not by destroying the facilities,
but by rendering the area uninhabited and potentially uninhabitable.
That means that even if the Mississippi remains navigable, the
absence of a port near the mouth of the river makes the Mississippi
enormously less useful than it was. For these reasons, the United
States has lost not only its biggest port complex, but also the
utility of its river transport system -- the foundation of the
entire American transport system. There are some substitutes, but
none with sufficient capacity to solve the problem.

It follows from this that the port will have to be revived and, one
would assume, the city as well. The ports around New Orleans are
located as far north as they can be and still be accessed by ocean-
going vessels. The need for ships to be able to pass each other in
the waterways, which narrow to the north, adds to the problem.
Besides, the Highway 190 bridge in Baton Rouge blocks the river
going north. New Orleans is where it is for a reason: The United
States needs a city right there.

New Orleans is not optional for the United States' commercial
infrastructure. It is a terrible place for a city to be located, but
exactly the place where a city must exist. With that as a given, a
city will return there because the alternatives are too devastating.
The harvest is coming, and that means that the port will have to be
opened soon. As in Iraq, premiums will be paid to people prepared to
endure the hardships of working in New Orleans. But in the end, the
city will return because it has to.

Geopolitics is the stuff of permanent geographical realities and the
way they interact with political life. Geopolitics created New
Orleans. Geopolitics caused American presidents to obsess over its
safety. And geopolitics will force the city's resurrection, even if
it is in the worst imaginable place.
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57. Patrap
11:52 PM GMT on April 09, 2010
Attn. Republicans in New Orleans: Do You Know Where You Are?


An all-star lineup of GOP pols has gathered in New Orleans for the Southern Republican Leadership Conference. But do they have any idea where they are?

Here's what J.C. Watts told the conference-goers:

"Some might think that George W. Bush had his shortcomings," said Watts, "but let me tell you something -- history's going to be kind to George W. Bush."


Just up the street from the GOP's venue at the Hilton Riverside is the New Orleans Convention Center, where tens of thousands of people gathered in the days after Hurricane Katrina and waited in stifling heat without food or water for rescuers who didn't know they were there (even though the flood victims were on TV).

That was probably the low point in a catastrophic breakdown of government capacities at all levels -- local, state, and federal. But the biggest single failure was at the top: George W. Bush was the one man who would have cut through it all. But he was oddly disengaged for the balance of that terrible week. Some of it wasn't his fault. The New Orleans hurricane levee system had never been a national priority, so it's hard to lay their flawed designs on the Bush White House. But the Bush administration made an organizational hash of FEMA and Homeland Security, and, populating offices throughout the federal government with Mike Brown and other political hacks, degraded its capacity to act.

So no, I doubt that history is going to vindicate Bush on this particular point. No amount of retrospective scrubbing can erase the image of that week or the remaining empty stretches of cityscape. It would be helpful -- to them and to the nation -- if the Republican Party acknowledged the reality around them in New Orleans, a city that is coming alive five years after Katrina but still in great peril from hurricanes. The combination of bottom-up civic activity (in the face of fumbling bureaucracies) is something both parties can learn from and put to use. And the challenge of protecting the city -- a partnership between government at all levels and private industry -- is ongoing, and a good template for future challenges in a time of unpleasant environmental surprises.

This post first appeared on my True/Slant blog.
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56. Patrap
11:37 PM GMT on April 09, 2010
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55. Patrap
10:55 PM GMT on April 09, 2010
Orleans Ballroom

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54. Patrap
3:38 PM GMT on April 09, 2010
53. Patrap
5:31 PM GMT on April 08, 2010
VIDEO: Colbert Report,Joe Bastardi vs Brenda Ekwurzel
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52. Patrap
4:11 PM GMT on April 08, 2010
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51. EmmyRose
3:16 PM GMT on April 08, 2010
I cant put the comment he made out on the blogs but lemme tell you he's something else...

yep I know Im just reading whats out there...
it only takes one...we know that....

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50. Patrap
3:12 PM GMT on April 08, 2010
I dont get too wrapped up in those numbers Emmy..

Best to focus on the preps and well..you know.

Have a good Thursday.

Treme has excellent reviews as well.

John Goodman is a good friend of Levee's.org Sandy Rosenthal who is the major THORN in the COE's butt.

John is a True New Orleanian and defender of the Faith.
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49. EmmyRose
3:12 PM GMT on April 08, 2010
HBO is doing a series called "TREME" starting this SUNDAY. I saw previews on Stephen Colbert last night..John Goodman went OFF on the Army CORP of engineers..
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48. EmmyRose
3:10 PM GMT on April 08, 2010
This morning, after reading some of the early predictions of the summer we may, or may not have, and taking a BIG gulp of coffee...I finally realized why the NHC is the last to weigh in......

breath deep.

Its gonna be okay.

take care and be prepared.
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47. Patrap
2:58 PM GMT on April 08, 2010
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46. Patrap
2:56 AM GMT on April 08, 2010
University Professors Association is investigating Ivor van Heerden's dismissal


In a strongly worded letter, the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) has alerted Michael Martin, Chancellor of Louisiana State University (LSU) that, in its opinion, the firing of Professor Ivor van Heerden "raises significant issues of academic freedom, tenure and due process."

Two months ago, van Heerden, the former deputy director of the Louisiana State University (LSU) Hurricane Center filed a wrongful termination lawsuit in state court against the flagship university.

Van Heerden alleged that LSU officials waged a campaign of retaliatory harassment for his criticism of the federal Army Corps of Engineers. Louisiana State University receives large federal grants from the Corps.

Apparently Chancellor Martin had ignored previously written letters to his office setting forth AAUP's concerns regarding actions taken by LSU administration to terminate the services of Dr. van Heerden.


John Barry, Oliver Houck, Dr. Mtangulizi Sanyika, Bill Schulz and Harry Shearer listen to the organizers of Ivor van Heerden's press conference. Photo by Sandy Rosenthal

The most recent letter dated April 5, 2010 puts LSU on alert that the AAUP shall "establish an ad hoc committee composed of persons who have had no previous involvement with the particular matter, to conduct its own full inquiry without prejudgement of any kind." (Hat tip to the Editilla at the New Orleans Ladder for posting this information first.)

When the professor announced his intention to sue LSU, he was flanked by big name supporters including John Barry (author Rising Tide), Harry Shearer (actor, filmmaker), Oliver Houck (Tulane University law professor), Mtangulizi Sanyika (African American Leadership Project), and Jed Horne (author Breach of Faith).

At the time, few media reports mentioned this significant show of support. This ad hoc investigation now shows, yet again, that Ivor van Heerden is far from alone on this journey to find out the truth about Ivor van Heerden's firing.


Harry Shearer, and Dr. Ivor Van Heerden discuss Katrina,the Response and more in 2007










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45. Patrap
1:06 AM GMT on April 08, 2010



Flying Across the Moon

The International Space Station flew across the face of the moon over NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida approximately 15 minutes before the launch of space shuttle Discovery on the STS-131 mission. Discovery successfully launched on April 5 and is now docked with the station. STS-131 will deliver the multi-purpose logistics module Leonardo, filled with supplies, a new crew sleeping quarters and science racks that will be transferred to the International Space Station's laboratories. The crew also will switch out a gyroscope on the station%u2019s truss, install a spare ammonia storage tank and retrieve a Japanese experiment from the station%u2019s exterior.

Image Credit: Photo courtesy of Fernando Echeverria
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44. Patrap
5:36 PM GMT on April 07, 2010
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43. Patrap
4:20 PM GMT on April 07, 2010
Gary makes some good points juslivn,..thats why I posted that one.

Thanx for stopping in too..!
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42. juslivn
4:18 PM GMT on April 07, 2010
Hi Pat, "liked" post 25 here, among others...thanks. Hope you are well. Have a good rest of the week.
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41. Patrap
3:22 PM GMT on April 07, 2010
"New Orleans Is Sinking"

Bourbon blues on the street loose and complete
Under skies all smoky blue-green
I can Forksake the dixie dead shake
So we dance the sidewalk clean
My memory is muddy what's this river I'm in
New Orleans is sinking and I don't want to swim

Colonel Tom What's wrong? What's Going On
You can't tie yourself up for a deal
He said" Hey North you're south shut you big mouth
You gotta do what you feel is real."
Ain't got no picture postcards ain't go no souvenirs
My baby she don't know me when I'm thinking about those years

Pale as a light bulb hanging on a wire
Sucking up to someone just stoke the fire
Picking out the highlights of the scenery
Saw a little cloud looked a little like me

I had my hands in the river
My feet back up on the banks
Looked up to the Lord above and said hey man thanks
Sometimes I fell so good I gotta scream
She says Gordie baby I know exactly what you mean
She said, she said I swear to God she said

My memory is muddy what's this river I'm in
New Orleans is sinking and I don't want to swim





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40. Patrap
3:16 PM GMT on April 07, 2010
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39. Patrap
3:13 PM GMT on April 07, 2010
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38. Patrap
2:47 PM GMT on April 07, 2010
It don't come easy,
You know it don't come easy.

It don't come easy,
You know it don't come easy.

Got to pay your dues if you wanna sing the blues,
And you know it don't come easy.
You don't have to shout or leap about,
You can even play them easy.

Forget about the past and all your sorrows,
The future won't last,
It will soon be over tomorrow.

I don't ask for much, i only want your trust,
And you know it don't come easy.
And this love of mine keeps growing all the time,
And you know it just ain't easy.

Open up your heart, let's come together,
Use a little love
And we will make it work out better.

(ah -)
(ah -)
(ooh-ooh)
(ah-ooh-ooh)

Got to pay your dues if you wanna sing the blues,
And you know it don't come easy.
You don't have to shout or leap about,
You can even play them easy.

Peace, remember peace is how we make it,
Here within your reach
If you're big enough to take it.

I don't ask for much, i only want your trust,
And you know it don't come easy.
And this love of mine keeps growing all the time,
And you know it don't come easy.



Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
37. Patrap
1:24 AM GMT on April 07, 2010
We look forward to that for sure padna..

Jazz Fest begins the 23rd..


My Neighbors plays dat day,the Great Saxaphonist James Rivers Movement


Friday, April 23
Lionel Richie, Black Crowes, Dr. John, Steel Pulse, George Clinton & Parliament/Funkadelic, Baaba Maal, Elvin Bishop, Chocolate Milk, Jon Cleary, Frankie Ford, Deacon John, Joe Lovano, Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Bands 100 Year Celebration, Irma Thomas Tribute to Mahalia Jackson, The Joe Krown Trio with Walter Wolfman Washington and Russell Batiste Jr., Lena Prima, Anders Osborne, John Fohl & Johnny Sansone, Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers Tribute to Rockin Dopsie Sr., Maurice Brown Effect, Kenny Neal, Glen David Andrews, Mia X, Cheeky Blakk, and Ms. Tee, OTRA, Nathan & the Zydeco Cha Chas, Leah Chase, Bruce Daigrepont Cajun Band, Little Freddie King Blues Band, The Revivalists, Leroy Jones & New Orleans Finest, Tommy Sancton New Orleans Quintet, Lost Bayou Ramblers, New Orleans Night Crawlers, The Revealers, Rotary Downs, James Rivers Movement, Spencer Bohren, Jesse McBride presents the Next Generation, Jeffery Broussard & the Creole Cowboys, David Egan, Kipori Woods, Semolian Warriors and Comanche Hunters Mardi Gras Indians, Mas Mamones, Shades of Praise, Franklin Avenue Baptist Church Mass Choir, Clive Wilsons New Orleans Serenaders feat. Butch Thompson, Jambalaya Cajun Band with special guest Merlin Fontenot, Real Untouchables Brass Band, Beth Patterson, June Gardner & the Fellas, Kevin Thompson & the Sensational Six, Native Nations Intertribal, Chip & Polly Radke with the God%u2019s House Choir, Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Ensemble, Mount Hermon Mass Choir, Alexis Marceaux Band, Smitty Dees Brass Band, Black Mohawk Mardi Gras Indians, Kat Walker Jazz Combo, Natasha Richard of Canada, Delgado Community College Jazz Ensemble, John Lee & the Heralds of Christ, The Bester Singers with the Dynamic Smooth Family Gospel Singers, Keep N It Real and Single Ladies Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs, Grey Hawk, Brass Band Throwdown with the Behrman Charter & O. Perry Walker School Bands, Family Ties and Big Nine Social Aid & Pleasure Club, McDonogh #42 Elementary School Performers
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
36. sandcrab39565
1:21 AM GMT on April 07, 2010
Thanks for the kind words my friend. I am going to try to get over that way in the next couple of weeks to visit the kids hopefully we can get together during my visit.
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35. Patrap
9:53 PM GMT on April 06, 2010



J B explains the "Big", "Bold", 2010 Cane Season in the Atlantic..

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34. Patrap
6:16 PM GMT on April 06, 2010
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32. Patrap
6:05 PM GMT on April 06, 2010
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
31. Patrap
5:52 PM GMT on April 06, 2010
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
30. Patrap
4:04 PM GMT on April 06, 2010
University Professors Association is investigating Ivor van Heerden's dismissal


In a strongly worded letter, the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) has alerted Michael Martin, Chancellor of Louisiana State University (LSU) that, in its opinion, the firing of Professor Ivor van Heerden "raises significant issues of academic freedom, tenure and due process."

Two months ago, van Heerden, the former deputy director of the Louisiana State University (LSU) Hurricane Center filed a wrongful termination lawsuit in state court against the flagship university.

Van Heerden alleged that LSU officials waged a campaign of retaliatory harassment for his criticism of the federal Army Corps of Engineers. Louisiana State University receives large federal grants from the Corps.

Apparently Chancellor Martin had ignored previously written letters to his office setting forth AAUP's concerns regarding actions taken by LSU administration to terminate the services of Dr. van Heerden.


John Barry, Oliver Houck, Dr. Mtangulizi Sanyika, Bill Schulz and Harry Shearer listen to the organizers of Ivor van Heerden's press conference. Photo by Sandy Rosenthal

The most recent letter dated April 5, 2010 puts LSU on alert that the AAUP shall "establish an ad hoc committee composed of persons who have had no previous involvement with the particular matter, to conduct its own full inquiry without prejudgement of any kind." (Hat tip to the Editilla at the New Orleans Ladder for posting this information first.)

When the professor announced his intention to sue LSU, he was flanked by big name supporters including John Barry (author Rising Tide), Harry Shearer (actor, filmmaker), Oliver Houck (Tulane University law professor), Mtangulizi Sanyika (African American Leadership Project), and Jed Horne (author Breach of Faith).

At the time, few media reports mentioned this significant show of support. This ad hoc investigation now shows, yet again, that Ivor van Heerden is far from alone on this journey to find out the truth about Ivor van Heerden's firing.



Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
28. Patrap
5:20 PM GMT on April 05, 2010
What were dese Pyrates tinking Emms..?


I wouldnt mess with da Cajun Tanker..
No Sir..


Louisiana-bound tanker may have been hijacked by Somali pirates
By The Associated Press
April 05, 2010, 11:25AM



A South Korean navy destroyer rushed toward a U.S.-bound supertanker believed to have been hijacked by Somali pirates with up to $160 million of crude oil on board, officials said Monday, the latest bold seizure in the Indian Ocean.

Valero Energy Corp., an oil and gas refining company based in San Antonio, said it owns the cargo on board the tanker, but could not confirm the hijacking.

"We've had reports to that effect, but there's been no official confirmation," said Bill Day, a spokesman for Valero. But, he added, "Everything points to that."

The tanker's highly volatile cargo prevents crews from carrying guns on board or even lighting cigarettes while on deck. It was unclear what the warship would do once it reached the tanker since firing on the vessel would risk igniting the oil or leaking it into the sea.
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27. Patrap
5:00 PM GMT on April 05, 2010
Mr. Rove,A class act..

Knot.



You go Gurl..er,Guy,er..Dude,

March 28, 2007 Karl Rove Rappin At The Radio and Television Correspondents Association dinner.

CAUTION:Disturbing

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26. EmmyRose
4:56 PM GMT on April 05, 2010
I'd take a pirate over Rove any day LOL
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25. Patrap
4:55 PM GMT on April 05, 2010
Who Owns Anger?

Gary Hart

Author, Wirth Chair professor at the University of Colorado
Posted: April 5, 2010 11:12 AM



Tell me the complaint, says the doctor, and I can prescribe the remedy. For those who are not tea-partiers, it is difficult to understand clearly the nature of the complaint.

This may be in part due to the diverse nature of the party. Looking on from the outside, anger seems to be the glue holding together anarchists, libertarians, conservatives of various kinds, and groups harboring complex grievances.

It is necessary to tread lightly in commenting on the tea party phenomenon, as I've learned, to avoid being considered part of some mysterious elite that, as one angry man wrote to me, "talks down to people." My interest in trying to understand the tea party lies in the hope of some kind of communication. But it is hard to hold a conversation with someone who insists on shouting or who seems to want to get rid of a duly-elected president in the middle of his term or who is mad at the Congress, every member of which was elected by a majority of voters in his or her district or state.

One thing needs to be made clear. If anger is the admission dues for membership, then I qualify. I'm as angry as any tea-partier. So tea-partiers have to get over the notion that only they have a right to be angry. A lot of Americans are angry who don't necessarily therefore want to impeach Barack Obama, or spit on congressmen, or scream at town hall meetings, or bring down the government of the United States. No one, including the tea party, has a corner on anger.

For myself, I'm mad as hell about the corrupt lobbying system in Washington. I'm mad as hell about former members of Congress, and their families, who make millions trading on a title the voters gave them. I'm mad as hell at people who like government when their side occupies it but think they have a right to bring it down when their side loses. I'm mad as hell at a government that wiretaps my phone or throws me in jail without a warrant. I'm mad as hell at people who claim to revere the Constitution and hate the institutions it created and the elected officials who inhabit them. No one in the tea party, including former governor Palin, is more angry than I am at Wall Street bankers. They are the greediest bunch of human beings I've ever seen.

Let's get one thing straight: the president and members of Congress are elected by the people of the United States. If you don't like that, there are lots of other countries where this is not the case. If you are angry at Barack Obama, or any member of Congress, you are angry at your fellow citizens who voted for them. There is a name for this process: we call it democracy.

Simply losing an election is not sufficient grounds to advocate overthrow of the government.

If tea party anger is more complicated than losing an election, then what is it? Is it losing a job, losing a house, having medical bills, living on food stamps, or all the above? If so, damn straight. I'd be angry too. The university where I work could fire me any day, without notice. It hasn't happened yet, but it could. Would I be angry if it did? You bet. But if this anger is something else, let's say bitterness at a black couple in the White House, or women being more equal, or medical care for poor children, or efforts to create a more decent and humane society, then there is little we can talk about.

If the tea party draws up a manifesto to clean up the air and water, to outlaw former elected officials from lobbying, to get rid of nuclear weapons, to take care of sick children and have Wall Street bankers pay for it, to provide decent care for wounded soldiers, to lock up drug dealers and clean up ghettos, to create jobs for working people, and to enforce the Fourth Amendment, I'll be the first to sign
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