moonlightcowboy's WunderBlog

99L INVEST and other CV waves

By: moonlightcowboy, 1:44 AM GMT on July 31, 2007


Current CV Waves

Tropical weather discussion
NWS TPC/National Hurricane Center Miami FL
805 PM EDT Mon Jul 30 2007

Tropical Depression 3

...Special feature...
a 1009 mb low is centered about 200 miles NNW of Bermuda and is
expected to continue moving to the NNE or NE over the next day
or two before merging with a frontal boundary on Wednesday.
Scattered showers and possible isolated thunderstorms are within
120 nm of line from 28n68w E of Bermuda along 32n63w to 39n67w.
Although the upper-level winds are not favorable for significant
development...this system still has the potential to become a
tropical cyclone before it merges with the frontal zone.

99L INVEST--

7n-13n between 44w-53w is centered about 800 miles E of the S
Windward Islands and is associated with a tropical wave.
Environmental conditions appear favorable for some development
of this system over the next couple of days.

...Tropical waves...
tropical wave in the E Atlc is along 28w S of 18n with a 1009 mb
low along the wave near 12n moving W near 10 kt. Broad low/mid
level cyclonic curvature is observed covering the area from
25w-32w. Scattered showers are from 9n-14n between 27w-31w.


Tropical - GOES-East IR 4 Floater

Tropical Latest Image - GOES-East IR 4 Floater #1

Nice, round structure, expanding, good outflow and banding features.


99L and the ITCZ

my thought is that we've been seeing the Itcz move further north as it tends to do as peak season approaches. And with that, the Itcz brings moisture. In recent days, the Itcz has been regularly above 10n in the eATL, but dropped southwards closer to SA.

According to the lastest sfc map, which also shows 99L with a 1011 low, 99L is still embedded in the Itcz. But, barely. At 50w the Itcz dives back swest towards SA.

If the Itcz moves more north from the west of 99L, the it also continues to erode the dry air. If it doesn't and 99L can't break free then it may move too far south and ultimately dissipate. I don't think that'll be the case.

Of course, at some point if 99L gains enough strength, it will break free from the Itcz and coriolis will take place, a depression will form and enter the Caribbean. There is high TCHP and present steering currents take this into a potentially dangerous situation.


[GOES-12 14 km WV]
RAMSDIS 14 km Water Vapor


Personal Observation/Opinion

99L is moving west at near 10n,50w and is undergoing its diurnal max phase where convection is likely to flare up again around the coc with the night's evaporative cooling. There is some dry air to the n and w, but at present time, is not near the coc which is still pulling moisture from the Itcz which also appears to be nudging north and could relax the dry air.

A good test will be to see how it handles di min during the day on Tuesday and whether it gains any latitude, which it's going to have to do rather quickly.

There is also another wave in the eATL associated with a sfc low. It's in a moist vapor environment and has convection, but is also embedded in the Itcz. Again these CV waves have been riding the Itcz which has been more northwards in the eAT:, but dives southwards towards SA.

Dust is not really a factor in the cATL, but there has been dry air to the north and west. But, that can change fairly quickly. The itcz moving northwards (as it should this time of year) should also relax the dry air. As August approaches, it's becoming apparent that the "wave train" is cranking up. So, get ready, they're coming!

vis-l.jpg(Track of "gut feeling"...this CATL wave, or the next one)
I've penned a drawing over one of the SAT pics to show a hypothetical CV wave location, development and track. My "gut" tells me a storm (this wave or not), or one from a sfc low in the Caribbean will possibly develop before the end of July(not wishcasting, or otherwise). I'm also thinking that it's possible that a developed storm could make landfall on the Texas coast as the "Lonestar" state has had it's share of A,B,C named storms through the years. That could be the case this year, too, if present steering conditions hold up; but they are subject to change frequently. Just my perspective at a hypothetical developing storm and track.

99L has a far better chances to become a storm than 96L did, as it formed under more shear and more dust. I think it's very possible that 99L could become Chantal (or Dean depending on what happens with TD3) within 48-60 hours; but it's got to climb in latitude, gain wrapping convection with some persistence for more than 12 hours. JMHO.

Missing
LATEST STEERING CURRENTS

Latest Surface Map
The itcz has been more north now than it has been through the season thus far. Note: (1) More latitude makes it easier for developing storms to escape the Itcz; (2) More Itcz moisture further north further weakens any SAL. Consequently, any waves moving off Africa now means more potential for wave development...the Cape Verde season has arrived.


CURRENT DUST LOOPS

There are several links to SAL, but EUMETSAT is my favorite. For me it shows a more true, actual view of the dust which is in pink. The links also show airmass and fog. These views appear to be "dimensional" and while SAL mostly occurs at the surface or low levels, if you'll take a look, it also shows orange and red, depicting a look at mid and upper level convection. For me this is a good first way to look at the layers of any developing CV storm.

EUMETSAT (dust angle 1)
EUMETSAT (dust angle 2)

REAL-TIME SAL satellite imagery for tracking can be found here, too.

The National Buoy Center


Thumbnail
LATEST NAVY MICROVAP
Notice the heavy amount of water vapor that has built back in off the African coast and in the CATL and the vapor field is also expanding further west, too!

MODELS

GFS 850 mb VORTICITY
200-850 vertical shear
24hr shear tendency

Missing
CURRENT MID LEVELS WATER VAPOR
Here's the current view of water vapor at the mid levels from the cimss. MUCH LESS dry air/dust(orange in this pic) now above 15n in the CATL and above 20n in the eATL. The previous waves have helped to pave the way creating more moisture and evaporative heat.

http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/met8/eatl/ir2-l.jpg
Latest Infrared Shortwave in the eATL



So, what is SAL? How does it effect storms?


The Saharan Air Layer (SAL) is a mass of very dry, dusty air which forms over the Sahara Desert during the late spring, summer, and early fall and usually moves out over the tropical Atlantic Ocean. The SAL usually extends between 5,000-20,000 ft (1500-6000 m) in the atmosphere and is associated with large amounts of mineral dust, dry air (~50% less moisture than a typical tropical sounding), and strong winds (~25-55 mph or ~10-25 m/s).

The SAL has been shown to have significant negative impact on tropical cyclone intensity. Its dry air can act to weaken a tropical cyclone by inhibiting updrafts in the storm, while its strong winds can substantially increase the vertical wind shear in and around the storm environment. It is not yet clear what effect the SAL's dust has on tropical cyclone intensity, though some studies have suggested that it too may have a negative impact on intensification.

The SAL can cover an area the size of the continental U.S. and has been tracked as far west as the Caribbean Sea, Central America, and the Gulf of Mexico.
--contributed by Jason Dunion and submitted by WU's Hipdeep1



...more coming soon!

MLCgoodnight4.gif

"Hold down the fort and keep the gates closed!"
Have a good one!
MLC

CV waves/storms and SAL--Friday, July 27

By: moonlightcowboy, 11:37 PM GMT on July 26, 2007


Current CV Waves

Tropical weather discussion
NWS TPC/National Hurricane Center Miami FL
805 PM EDT Mon Jul 30 2007

...Special feature...
a 1009 mb low is centered about 200 miles NNW of Bermuda and is
expected to continue moving to the NNE or NE over the next day
or two before merging with a frontal boundary on Wednesday.
Scattered showers and possible isolated thunderstorms are within
120 nm of line from 28n68w E of Bermuda along 32n63w to 39n67w.
Although the upper-level winds are not favorable for significant
development...this system still has the potential to become a
tropical cyclone before it merges with the frontal zone.

A broad area of multilayered clouds with scattered showers from
7n-13n between 44w-53w is centered about 800 miles E of the S
Windward Islands and is associated with a tropical wave.
Environmental conditions appear favorable for some development
of this system over the next couple of days.

...Tropical waves...
tropical wave in the E Atlc is along 28w S of 18n with a 1009 mb
low along the wave near 12n moving W near 10 kt. Broad low/mid
level cyclonic curvature is observed covering the area from
25w-32w. Scattered showers are from 9n-14n between 27w-31w.

http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/met8/eatl/ir2-l.jpg
Latest Infrared Shortwave


Personal Observation/Opinion

99L is moving west at near 10n,50w and is undergoing its diurnal max phase where convection is likely to flare up again around the coc with the night's evaporative cooling. There is some dry air, but it's no where near the coc. The invest is in a very moist environment and is likely to strengthen. A good test will be to see how it handles di min during th day on Tuesday and whether it gains any latitude, which it's going to have to do rather quickly.

There is also another wave in the eATL associated with a sfc low. It's in a moist vapor environment and has convection, but is also embedded in the Itcz. Again these CV waves have been riding the Itcz which has been more northwards in the eAT:, dives southwards towards SA.

Dust is not really a factor in the cATL, but there has been strong dry air in the north and to the west. But, that can change fairly quickly. As August approaches, it's becoming apparent that the "wave train" is cranking up. So, get ready, they're coming!

vis-l.jpg(Track of "gut feeling"...this CATL wave, or the next one)
I've penned a drawing over one of the SAT pics to show a hypothetical CV wave location, development and track. My "gut" tells me a storm (this wave or not), or one from a sfc low in the Caribbean will possibly develop before the end of July(not wishcasting, or otherwise). I'm also thinking that it's possible that a developed storm could make landfall on the Texas coast as the "Lonestar" state has had it's share of A,B,C named storms through the years. That could be the case this year, too, if present steering conditions hold up; but they are subject to change frequently. Just my perspective at a hypothetical developing storm and track.

Either of these waves have far better chances to become an invest than 96L did, as it formed under more shear and more dust. I think it's very possible that 99L could become Chantal within 48-60 hours; but it's got to climb in latitude, gain a wrapping convection with some persistence for more than 12 hours. JMHO.

Missing
LATEST STEERING CURRENTS

Latest Surface Map
The itcz has been more north now than it has been through the season thus far. Note: (1) More latitude makes it easier for developing storms to escape the Itcz; (2) More Itcz moisture further north further weakens any SAL. Consequently, any waves moving off Africa now means more potential for wave development...the Cape Verde season has arrived.


CURRENT DUST LOOPS

There are several links to SAL, but EUMETSAT is my favorite. For me it shows a more true, actual view of the dust which is in pink. The links also show airmass and fog. These views appear to be "dimensional" and while SAL mostly occurs at the surface or low levels, if you'll take a look, it also shows orange and red, depicting a look at mid and upper level convection. For me this is a good first way to look at the layers of any developing CV storm.

EUMETSAT (dust angle 1)
EUMETSAT (dust angle 2)

REAL-TIME SAL satellite imagery for tracking can be found here, too.

The National Buoy Center


Thumbnail
LATEST NAVY MICROVAP
Notice the heavy amount of water vapor that has built back in off the African coast and in the CATL and the vapor field is also expanding further west, too!

MODELS

GFS 850 mb VORTICITY
200-850 vertical shear
24hr shear tendency

Missing
CURRENT MID LEVELS WATER VAPOR
Here's the current view of water vapor at the mid levels from the cimss. MUCH LESS dry air/dust(orange in this pic) now above 15n in the CATL and above 20n in the eATL. The previous waves have helped to pave the way creating more moisture and evaporative heat.


So, what is SAL? How does it effect storms?


The Saharan Air Layer (SAL) is a mass of very dry, dusty air which forms over the Sahara Desert during the late spring, summer, and early fall and usually moves out over the tropical Atlantic Ocean. The SAL usually extends between 5,000-20,000 ft (1500-6000 m) in the atmosphere and is associated with large amounts of mineral dust, dry air (~50% less moisture than a typical tropical sounding), and strong winds (~25-55 mph or ~10-25 m/s).

The SAL has been shown to have significant negative impact on tropical cyclone intensity. Its dry air can act to weaken a tropical cyclone by inhibiting updrafts in the storm, while its strong winds can substantially increase the vertical wind shear in and around the storm environment. It is not yet clear what effect the SAL's dust has on tropical cyclone intensity, though some studies have suggested that it too may have a negative impact on intensification.

The SAL can cover an area the size of the continental U.S. and has been tracked as far west as the Caribbean Sea, Central America, and the Gulf of Mexico.
--contributed by Jason Dunion and submitted by WU's Hipdeep1



...more coming soon!

MLCgoodnight4.gif

"Hold down the fort and keep the gates closed!"
Have a good one!
MLC

TROPICAL LAGNIAPPE

By: moonlightcowboy, 12:10 AM GMT on July 24, 2007

TROPICAL LAGNIAPPE is a quick access blog of regular WU bloggers for "a little something extra" from Dr. Master's blog with links to some of WU's respected and reliable, weather-casting members with good tropical information and links. Please visit their sites. I always learn something each time I visit them!


PREPAREDNESS IS EVERYTHING! For some of the best info on "Hurricane Preparedness", please visit Hurricanecrab's Blog. He's a great poster on WU, been through some storms himself, and likes to stress preparedness and safety! These small efforts can have a large effect on the safety of peoples lives. You can make a difference!

StormJunkie's website is a super site filled with tons of great, comprehensive tropical weather information and links. He also has some GREAT TUTORIALS on models, etc. I learn something EVERY TIME I visit the site.

StormW's blog is a very knowledgeable meteorologist with a "top of the line" analysis. It's updated everyday except Sundays and compiles a fierce, in-depth study of current conditions and sharp observations! Be sure to check it out.

Quasi's blog is one of the most professionally presented weather blogs on WU. He has recently received his Meteorology degree and has posted a "101" weather learning series. Alec is quite knowledgeable and very helpful. Quasigeostropic's blog on Hurricane Forecasting Tutorial is a great, comprehensive blog on learning about developing tropical systems. It's a good read.

Skyepony's blog is great, too. Great information, posted nicely. Very organized and she's got a great feel for the weather and what's happening. She's experienced, having to determine what's going on with weather for her business, etc. So, while she's very smart and accurate, she almost seems to come by it naturally. It's a great blog with good, understandable information, especially when the Hurricane Hunters are flying and reporting data. Hey, and if you want to know about growing tomatoes - she's your source! :)

For the best WU coverage on SEVERE WEATHER, visit Vortfix's SEVERE WEATHER blog (this is his blog that explains tornadoes and severe weather and be sure to read through the comments). This blog operates almost 24/7 when there's a severe weather outbreak any where along the coastal/southeastern CONUS. Get nearly real-time warnings and radar links. Vort's an avid follower of severe weather with great information on potentially serious systems and he's a hound for insight during the cane season too.

Sandcrab's blog is another good one to follow. He's been deeply involved with emergency preparedness and has shouldered responsibilities in an official capacity up close and personally. He's knows and is connected to information! And, he follows this stuff closely (in his blood), minute by minute - a good fella to know when harm's way comes calling!

CatastrophicDL has come up with a great blog called 72-hr Emergency Kit Preparation. It addresses materials, safety, cooking, etc. She's an avid weather follower and knows her stuff, too, when it comes to observation and making calls. Be sure to read it and say hello to her there. (psssst - she has SEVEN children, too, so you know she's gotta be just great!)

Another excellent blogger is at Jphurricane's blog. Helpful always and has a good understanding of the tropics! A good guy to ask questions, too. You can tell it's in his blood.

Adrian's website which offers a TON of useful info on the tropics from tropical models to satellite imagery. Adrian is always VERY helpful with questions! This year he has made some bold, new and even better changes to his site - a must visit, too!

Another really good blog is done by TERRA NOVA! It's good, straight forward and complete. TN does a great job keeping up with the systems and explains them in an easy to understand manner. Good blog to visit and learn. Great blogger that's helpful with questions, too!

Also, be sure to check out Drakoen's blog. This blog is usually very detailed during season and Drakoen has really upped his tropical weather knowledge in the last couple of years and it shows. He can get a little complex, perhaps a bit sure of himself sometimes (LOL) but he does hold a good understanding of the tropics even though he and I may grumble sometimes.

ncforecaster's blog is also very clean and up to-date with current obs and links for quick reference. Tony is a VERY solid and helpful blogger and though I'm just beginning to blog with him, it's very obvious he's quite professionally a met and fully cognizant of what's going on in the tropics. He's Grrrreat! LOL ;P
Weather456's blog is also a very thorough tropical blog. He lives on the Caribbean Island of Saint Kitts in the Leeward Islands and has had a passion for tropical weather since Hurricane Georges. He's a frequent poster full of great information, full of current data and peripheral information regarding the tropics as well. He's a very avid follower of the tropics and an excellent "go to" for asking questions. He's probably the best wave spotter on the blogs.

AND, for an "ALL OUT RIOT" visit Nash's blog! Nash is outspoken (like many of us); but, no doubt speaks with conviction and great integrity. He's very knowledgeable about tropical weather and follows it very closely. And, he's quite helpful with questions and explanations. Simply said, the guy's very ambidextrous - he can talk politics (and surely does) and do tropical weather at the same time. But, be careful - wear your safety belt! LOL

A couple of extra blogs to follow this season are TampaSpin's blog and his personal website and KeeperoftheGate's blog. Both of these guys have very detailed sat and tropical-related links in their blogs and are very observant during the season. I've often blogged into the early hours following storms with these two. They must be good coffee drinkers because they sure hang with it! :)

There's others, too. Some of these sometimes vary with other weather-related info, etc; but, still just as informative and helpful: Sully's blog (also a WU featured blogger), HadesGodWyvern, Rainman32 for a great list of satellites and his famous "sat shot of the day." There are many others, too, like KmanIslander, Ike and even others who do not have regularly updated blogs but have great tropical insight.

Some are still getting blogs together for the season. And, I'm sure I've left someone out here, too - it was NOT intentional. I value our WU bloggers and friendships and appreciate all of them. Ask questions! It's a great way to learn, and this is a great group of folks to ask!



PLEASE CHECK OUT THESE WU MEMBERS -- GREAT TROPICAL INFO!


CAUTION: ALWAYS listen to and follow your local "AUTHORITIES" for storm information and instructions!


"Hold down the fort and keep the gates closed!"


MLCgoodnight4.gif

Hope you've enjoyed "Tropical Lagniappe" and also learned something! Remember, "PREPAREDNESS" is the name of the game!

Have a good one, but ALSO a safe one!

MLC

WU thoughts posting 1st blog

By: moonlightcowboy, 4:09 AM GMT on July 22, 2007

First things, first.

I've been a member here for a couple of years now, since before Katrina. This is a great site, very educational and informative. Of course, I am very novice to all of this cyclogenesis, but have learned a great deal from the wonderful fellow bloggers on WU. So, with creating my first attempt at a "blog" I thought it necessary to share a few things first.

There are many here with their own great blogs and websites, and I appreciate them and I want to say, THANK YOU! You're a terrific group and I have to add somewhat "addictive."

I know I've asked some elementary questions; but nearly always someone has been patient and gracious enough to take the time to answer and explain the topic. I beg your forgiveness if my lack of understanding, impatience and sometimes frustration have offended any of you. It is not my intention to be argumentative as I have a great deal of respect for most everyone here.

I sometimes have a self-conception as a defender of the newbies, especially the ones who ask questions and like myself, make mistakes and mis-statements. Having said that, please understand if I speak up in their regard sometimes. It's nothing personal, I just know how they feel. They simply want to learn, participate and occasionally receive some validation.

Of course this blog gets very opinionated sometimes when it comes to weather and especially politics of sorts. I have abstained from my personal political opinions, choosing not to litter the blog with them. However, I have made remarks on occasion to posted weather-related politics. And to my own discord, wish that I hadn't, as invariably it all ends up in trouble. I for one will try to refrain and promote better harmony. Until now, there hasn't been a great deal of active, tropical weather to discuss and I think we all meander off-topic at times. We're all different and consequently there will be different opinions on certain subjects. I can and will respect that, but I also expect the same.

It bothers me that the NHC, this blog and the public has had to endure this "director" dilemma. As Toffler said "change" is imminent. And so now, the NHC will also undergo change. Let's hope with all that has happened there is a resolve that will find a "better" NHC, as they are the "beacon" that drives public awareness and safety.

I welcome any comments, criticisms, suggestions or corrections. If you have any questions, I'll try and answer them in a timely, courteous and gentleman-like manner. If I don't know the answer I'll say so and also try to find the answer. Again, thanks for taking the time to read my first blog and mostly I extend a heart-felt "thank you" for being a terrific weather and WU companion!

Many kudos to you all!!!
MLC

MLCgoodnight4.gif


--------------------------------------------------------

CAUTION: (lol) This is a WIP (work in progress) and coming from a novice and someone who also has a demanding occupation. So, it may take some time to refine it so that it is hopefully at least "digestible" and "heart-burn" free. Also, please, ALWAYS FOLLOW YOUR LOCAL "AUTHORTIES" FOR STORM INFORMATION AND INSTRUCTIONS. Anyway, so here goes now, Enter-At-Your-Own-Risk! lol

---------------------------------------------------------

CAPE VERDE storms and SAL


(Preface)
In recent weeks the blog has been looking for when and where 97L will form. Now it has and it's a fish! Now, where will 98L form. I say, our eAtl wave or maybe a sfc low coming off the SA coast.

96L was sheared away, but it became what many of us thought might be our first Verde storm of the season. It wasn't and since then, our interests should turn mostly towards the Atlantic and Cape Verde systems.

I'm going to make an attempt to show current conditions, study SAL and report its effects on developing storms. It'll not be comprehensive from the beginning obviously; but, I will attempt to post or re-post at least some SAL information as frequently as possible and as available.

Current CV Waves

Tropical weather discussion
NWS TPC/National Hurricane Center Miami FL
805 PM EDT sun Jul 22 2007
...Tropical waves...
tropical wave is W of the Cape Verde Islands along 27w S of 18n
moving W 10-15 kt. The wave is fairly well organized with
cyclonic turning covering a broad area. A 1010 mb low is
embedded on the wave axis near 13n27w. Scattered moderate
convection is confined to the ITCZ from 10n-12n between 22w-28w.


http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/met8/eatl/ir2-l.jpg
Latest Infrared Shortwave


Personal Observation/Opinion

With fair organization and cyclonic turning already, this wave could be 98L within 48-60 hours. SAL is located mostly to the north of the system and while there is SAL further west in front of it, there is room for some development and can likely survive any further dust interaction. There is a surface low that has dropped to 1010 mbs. There is low shear, but the latest surface map doesn't have the 30 kt winds like it did earlier. It'll be interesting to see what happens in the night. But, a lower pressure I think means things are trying to develop.

Direction is to the west and with some strengthening could escape the ITCZ which currently drops further southwards. If pressure continues to drop, I think we'll have a possible invest sometimes late Monday or Tuesday.

Latest Surface Map


CURRENT DUST LOOPS

There are several links to SAL, but EUMETSAT is my favorite. For me it shows a more true, actual view of the dust which is in pink. The links also show airmass and fog. These views appear to be "dimensional" and while SAL mostly occurs at the surface or low levels, if you'll take a look, it also shows orange and red, depicting a look at mid and upper level convection. For me this is a good first way to look at the layers of any developing CV storm. If you've a different link that can better represent SAL presence combined with convection, please advise me here and I'll post it!

EUMETSAT (dust angle 1)
EUMETSAT (dust angle 2)



REAL-TIME SAL satellite imagery for tracking can be found here, too.

Thumbnail

This navy microvap shot shows that there is more dry air and possibly less dust than may have been considered. Some moisture is trying to build back in at about 12n and westward in front of the wave.

There is still dry air and some dust to its north and some also to the west. It continues to hug the Itcz for moisture and is racing westwards toward the islands at 25 kts and also has become more perpendicular in its trek.

There is some visible mid to upper rotation near 11n,32w. However, it's still got a long way to reach invest status as most of the convection is to the southern most part of the wave and is not very well organized.

I still give it a reasonable chance for development if can make it through the remaining dry air and find the islands. Lots of vapor there. That is JMHO.




Missing
CURRENT MID LEVELS WATER VAPOR
Here's the current view of water vapor at the mid levels from the cimss. So, we see SAL also penetrates the mid-levels and less at the upper levels. Notice the pocket of dust(orange in this pic)in the middle of the Atl. Dust was considerably heavier a few weeks ago when 96L was trying to form.

So, what is SAL? How does it effect storms?


The Saharan Air Layer (SAL) is a mass of very dry, dusty air which forms over the Sahara Desert during the late spring, summer, and early fall and usually moves out over the tropical Atlantic Ocean. The SAL usually extends between 5,000-20,000 ft (1500-6000 m) in the atmosphere and is associated with large amounts of mineral dust, dry air (~50% less moisture than a typical tropical sounding), and strong winds (~25-55 mph or ~10-25 m/s).

The SAL has been shown to have significant negative impact on tropical cyclone intensity. Its dry air can act to weaken a tropical cyclone by inhibiting updrafts in the storm, while its strong winds can substantially increase the vertical wind shear in and around the storm environment. It is not yet clear what effect the SAL's dust has on tropical cyclone intensity, though some studies have suggested that it too may have a negative impact on intensification.

The SAL can cover an area the size of the continental U.S. and has been tracked as far west as the Caribbean Sea, Central America, and the Gulf of Mexico.
--contributed by Jason Dunion and submitted by WU's Hipdeep1



...more coming soon!

---------------------------------------

TROPICAL LAGNIAPPE


For some of the best info on Hurricane Preparedness, please visit Patrap's Blog. He's a great poster on WU and likes to stress preparedness and safety!

StormJunkie also has a great website with tons of great tropical information and links. He's also a great "go to" for your questions.

StormW has a "top of the line" analysis in his blog. It's updated everyday except Sundays and compiles a fierce, in-depth study of current conditions and sharp observations! It's a "must-stop-by" and check out!

Another excellent blogger is at Jphurricane's blog. Helpful always, and I understand is about to attend meteorological studies! A good guy to ask questions, too. You can tell it's in his blood.

Drakoen's blog explains cyclogenesis and has a host of terms defined. He's also great for answering questions and stays constantly on top of developing conditions. He's also probably one of the best posters of current pics on the main blog and he can post them quickly when a topic arises!

Adrian's website which offers alot of useful info on the tropics from tropical models to satellite imagery. Always VERY helpful with questions!!!


The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

moonlightcowboy's WunderBlog

About moonlightcowboy

"There is no heavier burden than a great potential." - Charles Schultz, in the Peanut's character of Linus.